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  1. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Benskin View Post
    If the Zone System is too crude and tone reproduction is too technical, I wonder where the Goldilock's spot falls.

    I'm getting ready for work and don't have time to upload it, but there's an excellent example in Theory of the Photographic Process. I'll do it after work. Truthfully, I'm not exactly sure how to read it.
    I do not understand that tone reproduction is too technical, at least not in the kodak publication 'kodak professional black and white films'., I referred to before in this thread. I would say: it is very simple and written for the practical photographer. It is far more simple than the zone system books. In this thread, it was oted that the book is not available. However, I see that it can be obtained via Amazon. There is ieven a choice from different editions. I have the 1976 edition. I do not know whether the later reprints are different.

    Jed

  2. #92
    Stephen Benskin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    My intent is truly to blow out the background, it creates a perfect white, its a choice.

    As to my squiggles looking like curves, they are mockups of curves yes. In my illustrations though conceptually highlights are at the top shadows at the bottom, so consider the print curve flipped. I don't necessarily care where the density is, I want to understand how the subjects carry through.

    The intent of my illustrations is as a visualization tool.
    That helps. Thanks. Something conceptually similar is the gray scale comparison that Phil Davis uses in this program. It's basically the Dorst diagram but with colored in tones. From my perspecitve, you can get all that information and more from a tone reproduction diagram.
    Last edited by Stephen Benskin; 04-19-2013 at 10:16 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #93
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    All right. Too technical? Maybe and maybe not. Go back and look at the graphs I posted from Haist. There is nothing technical about that. Just simple logic and looking at a graph. Much simpler than other posts here, and no disrespect to those people, i am merely saying that the posts may go over some people's heads, thats all. Grant Haist has shown it with no math or fiddling. Just a simple film curve with "zones" showing print reproduction.

    And, btw, negative films are shown increasing in density from left to right, as are paper densities. Print densities are shown decreasing in density from left to right. This convention is used throughout the photographic industry including "gasp" digital.

    PE

  4. #94
    Stephen Benskin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    All right. Too technical? Maybe and maybe not. Go back and look at the graphs I posted from Haist. There is nothing technical about that. Just simple logic and looking at a graph. Much simpler than other posts here, and no disrespect to those people, i am merely saying that the posts may go over some people's heads, thats all. Grant Haist has shown it with no math or fiddling. Just a simple film curve with "zones" showing print reproduction.

    And, btw, negative films are shown increasing in density from left to right, as are paper densities. Print densities are shown decreasing in density from left to right. This convention is used throughout the photographic industry including "gasp" digital.
    Ron, the Haist curve examples are only film curves and not tone reproduction diagrams. Different uses. And yes the print goes from left to right in decreasing density or at least did. I believe the convention is changing in stand a lone paper curves, and the convention is a left to right increasing density for the paper curve when used in tone reproduction diagrams.
    Last edited by Stephen Benskin; 04-19-2013 at 11:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    All right. Too technical? Maybe and maybe not. Go back and look at the graphs I posted from Haist. There is nothing technical about that. Just simple logic and looking at a graph. Much simpler than other posts here, and no disrespect to those people, i am merely saying that the posts may go over some people's heads, thats all. Grant Haist has shown it with no math or fiddling. Just a simple film curve with "zones" showing print reproduction.

    And, btw, negative films are shown increasing in density from left to right, as are paper densities. Print densities are shown decreasing in density from left to right. This convention is used throughout the photographic industry including "gasp" digital.

    PE
    Too technical? Maybe and maybe not, that is the question. I am a physicist/ chemist and I like the Haist publication. But, I know that it is not the case for the average photographer. The text of the kodak publication is made for the practical photographer. They ( kodak people) told me that the text in the first edition has been modified in such a way that it was better to understand for the non scientific photographer. That was the second edition of 1976.

    Jed

  6. #96
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Is this better?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #97
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Is this better?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Yes, with one change suggested...

    Say "Neg", "Print"

  8. #98

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    The direction the curves goes depends on which side of the Greenwich Meridian you're own, so whether
    it's more convenient to look left or right. The shape of the curve is straightest near the equator, but is
    curved by the coreolis force the closer you get to the poles.

  9. #99
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    The direction the curves goes depends on which side of the Greenwich Meridian you're own, so whether
    it's more convenient to look left or right. The shape of the curve is straightest near the equator, but is
    curved by the coreolis force the closer you get to the poles.
    I haven't factored in our friends in the Southern Hemisphere either.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #100
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Benskin View Post
    Ron, the Haist curve examples are only film curves and not tone reproduction diagrams. Different uses. And yes the print goes from left to right in decreasing density or at least did. I believe the convention is changing in stand a lone paper curves, and the convention is a left to right increasing density for the paper curve when used in tone reproduction diagrams.
    Stephen, the "Y" axis shows the range of density from the negative curve that you will get in a print. Given that the print will reproduce values from 0.2 to 2.2 on average, this instantly shows you the print image range and the negative range it covers.

    If the silver criterion is adhered to, and it is in B&W, then you do not need 4 part diagrams to interpret what Haist shows. And, remember that there are several pages of tutorial along with those diagrams. Along with that, you have Mees. He too shows only the negative curve, and superimposed on that is the range of acceptable and unacceptable prints. They both show that you can derive everything in B&W from the simple film curve.

    PE



 

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