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Thread: light meter

  1. #11
    kintatsu's Avatar
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    I love my spot meter. It does 1 degree, so any reasonable area can be measured. As long as you're on your camera's axis, your readings will give you what you need to determine your exposure. My meter is a newer Gossen Starlite 2, but any decent spot meter will give you what you need.

    I've been trying to find an affordable SEI, which is nearly impossible. I have a couple older Gossens from the 60's and they're almost identical in the readings to the new spot mteter, so age isn't too much of a factor.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by STEVEP51 View Post
    HI GUYS when i shoot landscapes where do i point the light meter some landscapes can be in the distance and cant physcally take a reading all so do i use the white cone i use a sektronic meter and a6x7 M/F camera which im learning to use before i go to the usa please can you help MANY THANKS STEVE.
    You don't mention what type of film you are using, but incident readings may be more suited to transparency/reversal film and reflected readings for negative material. As to whether you spot meter and your decision to average, under or over expose, is impossible to say without seeing the subject/lighting conditions and knowing how you wish to interpret the image as a 2 dimensional photograph. Hope this helps a little.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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    I would never use an incident reading for a distant landscape, irrespective of film. That's a choice learnt from lessons long ago. Everything is multi-spot metered, and that is the recommendation for landscapes where there is a clear difference in contrasts (shade, bright sun, or shadow, emerging sun) — very especially if you are using transparency film. Small errors in metering are inconsequential with B&W because of latitude, something which is not in abundance with E6.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    I would never use an incident reading for a distant landscape, irrespective of film. That's a choice learnt from lessons long ago. Everything is multi-spot metered, and that is the recommendation for landscapes where there is a clear difference in contrasts (shade, bright sun, or shadow, emerging sun) — very especially if you are using transparency film. Small errors in metering are inconsequential with B&W because of latitude, something which is not in abundance with E6.
    I did say may be, but in general I beg to differ. Incident readings in general are more suited to the use of transparencies.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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    Another (probably goofy) idea is to get a Nikon N80 (F80) for less money than most meters and use the matrix metering function and spot function if you like. I got a working camera for $6. They are just not that desirable. You'd need a lens of course, and it requires AF. Call it goofy, but they are small, lightweight and cheap! Obviously it wont work if you are expecting to use a lens with f64 or f.09 or something.
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

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    Quote Originally Posted by kintatsu View Post
    I've been trying to find an affordable SEI, which is nearly impossible. I have a couple older Gossens from the 60's and they're almost identical in the readings to the new spot mteter, so age isn't too much of a factor.
    I understand your desire for an SEI photometer. I have one that I bought new in '66 at the first of several AA workshops I attended. The 1/2-degree spot is really nice, particularly if you need to read just the full moon. It's still going strong with the original bulb. But it did require a bit of heady mathematical gymnastics to use which became easier after practice. Like AA, I use it simply to find the luminance in c/ft^2 (which is the reciprocal of the shutter speed); the square root of the box speed represents the f-stop. That establishes Zone V; visualization adjustments follow from there. Heckuva meter.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I did say may be, but in general I beg to differ. Incident readings in general are more suited to the use of transparencies.

    No.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    No.
    Yes.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #19
    wiltw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I did say may be, but in general I beg to differ. Incident readings in general are more suited to the use of transparencies.
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour
    No.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliveh
    Yes.
    This is sounding like two four year olds arguing...can either of you state precisely WHY you contend your side of the argument?!

  10. #20
    kintatsu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silveror0 View Post
    I understand your desire for an SEI photometer. I have one that I bought new in '66 at the first of several AA workshops I attended. The 1/2-degree spot is really nice, particularly if you need to read just the full moon. It's still going strong with the original bulb. But it did require a bit of heady mathematical gymnastics to use which became easier after practice. Like AA, I use it simply to find the luminance in c/ft^2 (which is the reciprocal of the shutter speed); the square root of the box speed represents the f-stop. That establishes Zone V; visualization adjustments follow from there. Heckuva meter.
    I've never read anything bad about them. Having the 1/2 degree spot is an attractive feature, and from I've read, the range it can measure is greater than most of today's meters. That in itself is a boon for lower light levels, allowing one to shoot later into the evening. I like that it's sturdy and easy enough to hold on to while working, given the barrel shape. Unfortunately, even a broken one runs $300 when you can find it.

    Using my Starlite 2 is sweet, though. I use a process similar to what you mentioned to figure out the luminance values for my notes. Set at f/8, ISO 64, and the reciprocal of the shutter is my luminance, as you said. Once I know that, the math is simple enough.

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