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Thread: light meter

  1. #1

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    light meter

    HI GUYS when i shoot landscapes where do i point the light meter some landscapes can be in the distance and cant physcally take a reading all so do i use the white cone i use a sektronic meter and a6x7 M/F camera which im learning to use before i go to the usa please can you help MANY THANKS STEVE.

  2. #2

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    if you are using an invercone or some other device for an incident meter reading go stand out in front of the camera and point the cone at your lens and take a reading. You may want to modify the resulting reading if the distant scene is fairly dark, or fairly light...this is where bracketing helps a lot, by half-stops up and down.

    For a reflected reading, point it down at the ground, not at the sky, which is a lot brighter. Green grass is pretty close to an 18 percent gray. The advice on bracketing applies for this method too.

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    Green grass is pretty close to an 18 percent gray.
    No! Greenery (and landscapes in general) is pretty dark. That's why many people speak of "Sunny 11" instead of "Sunny 16". If you don't believe me, don't argue, just try with a light meter that allows both incident and reflected measurements. If the subject is a lanscape, the exposure from reflected measurement will be approx. 1 stop more than from incident (looking at light same as scene, i.e. opposite direction compared with reflected measurement).

  4. #4
    andrew.roos's Avatar
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    Hi Steve

    The white cone is used for incident measurements. That means that you are measuring the amount of light falling on the subject. This is done by standing at the subject and pointing the white cone at the camera.

    When you can't stand at the subject - for example, when shooting a distant landscape - you can measure the light reflected from the subject that arrives at the camera. To do this, you don't use the white cone - typically, you can either slide it away or physically remove it from the sensor. Then stand where the camera is and point the sensor towards the subject. It is usually a good idea to point it down a bit so you don't get too much light from the sky affecting the reading (unless of course the sky is the principal subject). Sky is typically brighter than the landscape, so measuring the sky brightness will result in under-exposure of the landscape, which is difficult to recover. Conversely, exposing for the landscape will result in over-exposure of the sky but this can often be recovered by burning-in the sky when printing (or by using a graduated ND filter when taking the photo).

    Alternatively, if you are confident that the light falling on a distant landscape is the same as the light falling where you are then you can measure incident light at your location (using the white cone, standing away from any obstructions and pointing the meter in the same direction it would be pointed if you were standing at the subject and pointing it back towards the camera) and then use this reading.

    Andrew

  5. #5
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    What other respondents have described here is correct.

    However, a much more accurate method is to spot meter distant scenes, very especially when there is mixed light (bright light, shadows, shifting light). Incident/reflective readings assume an overall average value of luminance across the scene, and this is the problem — such scenes I mentioned are not average in their distribution: there will be reflections, shadows, light areas, poorly defined areas...all have their own values.

    I do, strongly, advocate photographers diversify their metering regime and not rely solely on incident readings from afar. This cannot be emphasised enough in saving people from potentially disastrous results using transparency film in lighting conditions that can vary from marginal to extreme.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #6

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    LIGHT METER

    thank you guys very helpfull where would i be without you guys i learn more from you guys then the books i read.steve

  7. #7
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #8
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    I was messing around with Light Meter Tools, an app for my samsung galaxy s4 Android op system. My Minolta IIIf light meter just broke. Bernard is right about that the reflected reading requires one stop more even with gray card. I was surprised figuring it would be the same. Is this the app or do your meters work the same way.

    When I shoot landscape I usually bracket one stop click for negative and a half stop click for positive film in any case.

  9. #9
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    I believe Adams had essentially the same observation you do. Gray cards don't necessarily get you a direct reading match to the middle gray or zone V that anybody might want, nor to an incident meter.

    Reference cards of any color or shade, camera bags, blue jeans, whatever we choose to use, have to be placed or held at a proper angle and in the proper light and spot metered well to get close. Needing an offset from the spot/reflected meter reading to get camera setting is the norm even with a gray card.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #10
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    yessteve, get a good spotmeter before you gothe digital pentax is my fovorite. AAused it, so ,it is good enough for me.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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