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  1. #11
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    For color transparencies I set the aperture to the square root of the film ISO and open the shutter as long as necessary to get a good grouping of fireworks. The exposure may have to be short when there is too much skylight.

  2. #12
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    Mine worked but I was WAY too far away for my super wide angle pinhole camera. In the center of a completely black polaroid, I have an area about the size of a quarter, with 3 streetlamps, some cool looking car headlights and tail lights, and a little red blurry area where all the fireworks happened.... It actually looks sort of neat and I'm glad I did it, but next time I'm not doing it unless I'm right up under the fireworks.

  3. #13

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    I used f/11 with ISO 200 and it came out about just right. Didn't have any good shots. They are all boring.

  4. #14
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    I went and dealt with a huge crowd and hot humid weather for 10 minutes of the lamest fireworks ever seen. People in the crowd had better stuff than the city. Took two test shots that sucked and headed back to the Jeep to go home. Next year I think I'll fight the crowds in DC or Columbia MD. At least the display will be worth immortalizing.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by donkee View Post
    Normal lens, Bulb setting, f:11, cable release. Open the shutter long enough to grab a burst or two, or three, or more then move on to the next frame.
    This is the method I used yesterday evening on the roof of my parent's house in Podunk, Utah. I don't have the results yet, but I just applied what I learned about shooting lightning bolts.

  6. #16

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    Yeah F11 and a cable release is the way to go. I'm looking forward to seeing my shots since the camera I was shooting didn't have multiple exposure capabilities so I used the lens cap as a hat between good bursts.
    W.A. Crider

  7. #17
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    This one's a hardy perennial. Moved to the "Exposure" forum and stuck.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #18
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    Will be shooting some tomorrow (it is Diwali in India), I am curious, why the reccomendation for shooting longer exposures? I have shot hand-held on digital before and they have come out quite well - at about 1/30 or thereabouts (dont remember exactly). Longer exposures would necessitate tripod and little flexibility in movement, wouldn't it?
    (Diwali has everyone using fireworks, so little co-ordination, and more need for movement)

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Wide angle lens, aim at where you know or have a reasonable idea where the fireworks will appear in the sky. Bulb exposure at mid-aperture (f5.6) 30 seconds to capture several bursts, the longer exposure providing a huge number of 'trails'. ISO 200 to 400 film is good. It does not have to be perfect. Be it noted that the digital examples you see on the web are actually layers: several exposures superimposed, so too those of night skies.

    +1

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by analoguey View Post
    Will be shooting some tomorrow (it is Diwali in India), I am curious, why the reccomendation for shooting longer exposures?
    Just depends on what one wants the image to look like. Long exposures tend to match what we see...persistance of vision and all that -- we tend to take in the launch, peak and decent of a firework as a whole, when in reality, the tail of the firework can already be disappearing as the firework peaks.

    Also it is easier -- less worries about timing the shot.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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