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Thread: Exposure Record

  1. #11
    fotch's Avatar
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    One picture is worth a thousand words, this would be way to much work for me. I would rather be taking pictures or making prints.
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  2. #12

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    Added development info and flipped around. It would make sense to put that info at the top, doesn't it? :P
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  3. #13
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    This is a bit picky, but important.

    When you buy a film, the manufacturer has determined what its ISO speed is and that is what is on the box.

    If you decide to set your meter to a different setting, that isn't an ISO setting, it is your Exposure Index ("EI").

    You cannot change the film's ISO speed. You can modify the EI you choose to use.

    I would change "Shot ISO" to "EI Used"
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

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  4. #14

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    I don't think the exposure index or used Iso setting would make a big difference. Not to me anyway. I think it would be clear to most what is meant. Even in 10 years. I for one struggled a long time and stil do somtimes whith the term Exposure Index.
    Reality is whatever stays when you stop believing in it.
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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post

    Are you sure you can keep this up? It's a lot of work to have this kind of record for every frame of every roll. I don't doubt this is great idea. I just don't know if this is practical.
    I try to keep records like this, but unfortunately time and inertia sometimes prevent my good intentions.

    However, I have a friend who's been taking pictures, as a hobby, of local historical places, etc., for 40+ years and has always kept full records. After unexpected redundancy, he has been successful in turning his hobby into a small publishing business....which, as he says, with 50,000+ slides and negs would have never been possible without a reasonable filing system!

  6. #16
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    What I do is small info on negative holder sleeve - for example: Nikon F3, nikkor 105/2.5, Rodinal 1+100, Efke 100, Hamburg, 2013-07-03 and negative number. Every negative has unique number (2012-1, 2012-2 ... 2013-1, 2013-2 ...) that is exactly as folder name of scanned negatives on hard disk.
    And one small dot on negative holder sleeve below every frame that goes on print - so that I know which one are good ones that I printed.

    I don't do contact printing because lots of my frames are under/over exposed - so it is hard and also I am saving on paper.

  7. #17

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    When I was starting to put together a photo studio I had no flash meter, so I kept logs for what I shot at, how the lights were set up, etc. Over time I acquired a flash meter and learned lighting ratios and patterns. The log book was never opened nor looked at. After digital came along, along with a Maxxum 9 and F6 and F100 which record that stuff for you, I never logged a single thing.

    I need a log for my darkroom work though... it's like inventing the wheel again every time I go to print, especially color.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  8. #18

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    It's more important to record how you arrived at the exposure setting that you used. For example you measure the shadow area and stop down 2 stop. Or you made a close up reading of the subject face and use that. Without that kind of record the shutter speed/aperture / compensation doesn't mean much.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    It's more important to record how you arrived at the exposure setting that you used. For example you measure the shadow area and stop down 2 stop. Or you made a close up reading of the subject face and use that. Without that kind of record the shutter speed/aperture / compensation doesn't mean much.
    I guess it depends what the exposure record is for, but I'd agree with this for me. I record my "process" for getting to the exposure in various shorthand. Knowing myself, I could never keep something like this going with my negative sleeves.

    The problem I've run into is slightly different.... I keep my notes in a little moleskine notebook. All I write on the negative sleeve is enough to get me to the right place for that roll in the notebook. But what's happened is that over time the little moleskine notebook becomes more and more valuable because it contains more and more months of effort. I usually leave it in my car and when I come back I record all my shots in it... now I worry more and more about losing it and am becoming reluctant to take it with me on trips!

  10. #20

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    I wonder how useful these information will be at later date.

    Looking at a frame on my negatives, I can pretty much tell what kind of aperture was used. While I can't tell if it was f/4 or f/5.6, I can definitely tell if it was wide open at f/2.8 or closed like f/16. Based on conditions of the scene and the aperture, I can also tell if it was like 1/15 seconds, 1/250, or 1/2000.

    Even if I go back to the exactly the same location, I won't see an identical condition. Exposure can easily vary as much as 2 stops even if it looked the same to my eyes. It would be very unlikely, I will actually review these records.

    On my notebook, I keep dates, location, EI, developer used, and the time developed. I also keep note of anything "notable" for the particular shoot. It might say, "cloudy day" or "fine day - used red". That's all I need, personally.

    I don't discourage OP from doing what he's planning to do. But for me, it's an overkill for every roll of film. Maybe for a special project, I might.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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