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  1. #11
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rom View Post
    Dear Thomas,

    This Fern detail is wondeful ! Can you give us some details on the print ?

    Thanks for sharing.
    Thomas is excellent printer, just look at his gallery or flickr. So I think details will not help a lot, behind those prints are experienced hands ...

  2. #12
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    Captures...ick..

    anyway, take your pick, a mixture of 35 and medium format, mostly scans from prints.





    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
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    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    Thomas is excellent printer, just look at his gallery or flickr. So I think details will not help a lot, behind those prints are experienced hands ...
    Hey, thanks, but compared to many I'm just a hack...

    The print was made on Ilford MGIV fiber paper, in replenished Ethol LPD for 2.5 minutes. Matte surface, the print is 8x8 inches in size. Very little manipulation was required. I tried toning it, but found that I liked it better when neutral in tone like this. The trick to getting consistently good prints without too much darkroom gymnastics, is to make your negatives so that they work with your paper and paper developer well. You can, obviously, still make nice prints if your negative isn't ideal, but it helps a lot to know what to do with the film. My own approach is that I start with the paper. My standard paper for everything is Ilford MGIV fiber, and my only print developer is replenished Ethol LPD. I make my negatives so that they print well at medium contrast, which gives me a lot of flexibility to both increase and decrease contrast come printing time.

    Delta 3200 is a film that has fairly low inherent contrast. That is why it works so well to be push processed to higher exposure index.
    To yield a normal contrast print at medium contrast enlarger filtration, you want to develop the film for a fairly long time, and I have a hunch that this is why so many of us find that we need to develop the film longer than Ilford recommends.
    I used Edwal 12 for this negative, which gives brilliant results; it is the opposite of a compensating developer, it gives high intensity to the highlights, and you end up shooting your film almost like slide film when you use it.

    I hope those details help out a little bit in understanding the film, and how to treat it to yield contrast similar to other more 'normal' contrast films, like Tri-X or HP5.
    But any film developer does well with this film as long as you have the ability to build contrast.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Nice work, Chris.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Lange View Post
    Captures...ick..

    anyway, take your pick, a mixture of 35 and medium format, mostly scans from prints.





    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    Thank you, Thomas!

    3200 was the name of the game for me for a long, long time, whether that was pushed hp5/neopan 400/tri-x or using delta 3200. I have since began shooting in normal waking hours again, and so am doing less of the ridiculous push processing and negative wrangling that I used to, preferring FP4+ and normally exposed HP5+ for a lot of things...but looking at these again makes me want to load my A12s up with D3200 and cause some trouble...











    screw it...might as well throw a selfie in...

    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  6. #16
    Rom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Hey, thanks, but compared to many I'm just a hack...

    The print was made on Ilford MGIV fiber paper, in replenished Ethol LPD for 2.5 minutes. Matte surface, the print is 8x8 inches in size. Very little manipulation was required. I tried toning it, but found that I liked it better when neutral in tone like this. The trick to getting consistently good prints without too much darkroom gymnastics, is to make your negatives so that they work with your paper and paper developer well. You can, obviously, still make nice prints if your negative isn't ideal, but it helps a lot to know what to do with the film. My own approach is that I start with the paper. My standard paper for everything is Ilford MGIV fiber, and my only print developer is replenished Ethol LPD. I make my negatives so that they print well at medium contrast, which gives me a lot of flexibility to both increase and decrease contrast come printing time.

    Delta 3200 is a film that has fairly low inherent contrast. That is why it works so well to be push processed to higher exposure index.
    To yield a normal contrast print at medium contrast enlarger filtration, you want to develop the film for a fairly long time, and I have a hunch that this is why so many of us find that we need to develop the film longer than Ilford recommends.
    I used Edwal 12 for this negative, which gives brilliant results; it is the opposite of a compensating developer, it gives high intensity to the highlights, and you end up shooting your film almost like slide film when you use it.

    I hope those details help out a little bit in understanding the film, and how to treat it to yield contrast similar to other more 'normal' contrast films, like Tri-X or HP5.
    But any film developer does well with this film as long as you have the ability to build contrast.

    Thanks a lot Thomas for all the details very informative.

    And Chris, wonderful prints !
    All the best,
    Rom
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