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  1. #11
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bascom49 View Post
    I may have not clarified, this will be a black and white process.
    You said you were using HP5...
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #12
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bascom49 View Post
    I print on Ilford VC warm tone With a 2 1/2 filter
    for contact sheets I print On Ilford VC glossy
    Oops, I'm blind I guess.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #13

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    I print on Ilford VC warm tone With a 2 1/2 filter.
    for contact sheets I print On Ilford VC glossy with a 2 1/2 filter.

    My enlarger is 5x7 Durst 138.

    Thanks to all for the comments so far.

  4. #14
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    You'll be fine bascom49, good advice from markbarendt so I don't need to add...

    If you had framed the shot where the main interest was inside the back room behind the wall with graffiti... Then you might be looking at a scene with greater range that might need compensating developing. There are some good threads about that.

    But I don't think, with the shot as you show, that there is anything in that far-back room that you care to reveal.

    So treat it normally and you should be fine.

    If you find that the shot at 1/25 second is a "better" negative, I would recommend lowering your EI to agree with what gave you a good negative.

  5. #15
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    I'd use an averaging view meter that was calibrated so it produced negatives with 0.1 log d density four stops below the indicated reading. For a typical "picture of a building" as we have here, that approach has saved years of my life that would have been devoted to 'zone guessing' and procuring fiddly spot meter readings.

  6. #16
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    I'd meter the shadow area in the bushes, or the darkest shadows in the recesses of the building interior, and consider that to be Zone III. Then I'd meter the white front wall of the building and see how close that comes to falling on Zone VIII. I'd set the camera to the equivalent of Zone V, and shoot. If the building front falls at about Zone VII/VIII, then I'd develop normally. If it falls at about Zone IX or so, then I'd pull development a bit, depending on how far off VIII it is.

  7. #17
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    I would do pretty much the same as Terry, with a few additions:
    - shoot HP5 at 250
    - meter the darkest shadows of the interior, particularly the very dark door (I think) in the back wall and place that on Zone III (darkest area with shadow detail)
    - meter the white front and see where it falls and develop accordingly, bringing it down a little if it is into Zone IX

    As for developer and time, normally you have to do some tests in advance in order to control contrast.

    We will want to see the final print!

  8. #18
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    The answer is staring you in the face: you already took a digital image of the scene. Check the exposure information for that image. To simplify your calculations, set the ISO on the digital camera to the same value as the film.

    A digital rendition will actually have less latitude than the B&W negative you are planning to use. If you can see the shadow detail you want and the highlights are not blown out, your exposure can be the same as the digital exposure.

  9. #19
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    One thing I would do in metering is walk up close even with the spot meter. I am guessing the soligor is somewhat affected by ambient light as I know my digital Pentax is. I would have walked up and metered the wall inside with the graffiti and hoped I could get it to fall in a high zone 3. then I would have metered the white outside and put it in a high zone 7 to see where everything falls. I wouldn't have worried about any of the middle tones.
    Dennis

  10. #20
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by selmslie View Post
    The answer is staring you in the face: you already took a digital image of the scene. Check the exposure information for that image. To simplify your calculations, set the ISO on the digital camera to the same value as the film.

    A digital rendition will actually have less latitude than the B&W negative you are planning to use. If you can see the shadow detail you want and the highlights are not blown out, your exposure can be the same as the digital exposure.
    A digital shot, can provide a good reference, just depends on what "metering tool" someone wants to carry/use and also having tested/calibrated the reading all the way to the print. iPhone metering apps can do the same thing and show the readings in real time and allow one to pick the "spot" to meter.

    As to digital having less latitude, at one point in history that was generally true, not so much any more. (For details on why and how, those interested will need to research elsewhere.)
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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