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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by edcculus View Post
    I think I do need a "blacker" fabric like velvet.
    Black velvet has been a main stay of all studios to get pure black backgrounds for years. As long as it's not extreme side lighting, it should be perfectly black, though watch out for dust!

  2. #12

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    Thanks Fix! I'm actually using no backdrop. I have a long kitchen. I have my setup on one side am shooting out into the open kitchen with the lights turned off. Once I worked out lighting the object correctly and turned out the lights, the background disappeared nicely. (confession, I used my d1g1t@l camera to do some testing since I've never done this before). I was having the most problems with the surface.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Crawford View Post
    Black velvet has been a main stay of all studios to get pure black backgrounds for years. As long as it's not extreme side lighting, it should be perfectly black, though watch out for dust!

    Thanks. any advice on how to set up the lighting? I know that is really all subjective, but just some more general pointers?

  4. #14
    erikg's Avatar
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    Totally depends on what you are shooting, and how you want it to look. My advice would be to find some images that you like along the lines of what you are after and try to "reverse engineer" the lighting. Look at direction, quality, intensity. Sometimes it's not as easy as you might think and you almost always learn something as you move your lights around.

  5. #15
    wiltw's Avatar
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    S-E-P-A-R-A-T-E the background from the subject!!!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcculus View Post
    Thanks Fix! I'm actually using no backdrop. I have a long kitchen. I have my setup on one side am shooting out into the open kitchen with the lights turned off. Once I worked out lighting the object correctly and turned out the lights, the background disappeared nicely. (confession, I used my d1g1t@l camera to do some testing since I've never done this before). I was having the most problems with the surface.
    Since your problem is the supporting surface and not the background, have you considered working with instead of against it? For example, you can get a slab of black glass or 600x600mm polished black tile pretty cheaply and use that as your object support. Being black, it will have practically no diffuse response to your lighting but it will reflect a copy of the subject. That can look good in particular with darkfield lighting.

  7. #17

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    "In my camera last night was Kodak TMY. "

    I discovered something quite by accident some time ago, TMax film really does NOT like Potassium Bromide in the developer, will drop everything from zone 5 and lower down into the shadows of zone 1 but zone 5.5. Could be interesting for a 'film noir' look, may help you with this. I don't remember if it was the old TMax or the newer version, it was a while ago, BUT a little goes a long way, maybe start with 1g/l of working solution.

  8. #18
    munz6869's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Since your problem is the supporting surface and not the background, have you considered working with instead of against it? For example, you can get a slab of black glass or 600x600mm polished black tile pretty cheaply and use that as your object support. Being black, it will have practically no diffuse response to your lighting but it will reflect a copy of the subject. That can look good in particular with darkfield lighting.
    Yes, what he said, and also with black perspex, which if you live near an art supplies shop, is cut into handy sizes, and less bitey.

    This is actually one of my favourite techniques for shooting things, as demonstrated here:
    http://mrmarcmorel.wordpress.com/201...s-in-a-bottle/ On a white field, and here: http://mrmarcmorel.wordpress.com/201...rom-the-vault/ doing tricky stuff with a lit backdrop...

    Marc!
    Marc Morel
    photographie argentique!
    ------------
    http://mrmarcmorel.wordpress.com/

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