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  1. #11

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    no so much surprised in getting what i photographed, but surprised that i chose to photograph what i did
    sometimes it takes 6months or a few years to look when i have "distance"
    and then i say " huh, now i know what i was thinking "

  2. #12
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    It is rare to get a failure when it is important, but it is also regular for me when using my 4x5 or similarly any full manual camera, to do an "analog chimp" and check to see that the lens was set properly, that right dark slide was pulled, to check the ISO setting on the meter.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #13
    fotch's Avatar
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    So, she was hitting on you, invite her over to your darkroom so you can show her your tools and how they work.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  4. #14
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    I've had this discussion before, too, though before I'd used a digital (besides a P&S anyway). With film, I nearly always have a good idea what I'll have on my film, especially if I'm shooting while thinking. If I'm just rattling off shots to finish a roll or something, then it drops to most being what I expected. I've found that I'm more likely to need to change things after looking at the screen with the digital because I don't pay quite as much attention before the first shot. I also know that what I see on the LCD is not exactly what I'll get in the computer. And I've gone out with both and had a contact sheet in my hands before getting the files off the card into the computer. Yeah, the Tri-X ones were just what I thought they'd be, too.
    As long as my brain is engaged, I know what I'll have on film. (I'm still learning on 4x5, though - getting better with it)

  5. #15
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    The nice thing about open-book exams are the answers are there for you. The bad thing is you probably aren't really retaining much in that scenario. I feel the same way about LCDs on digital cameras.

    I'm surprized when one of my photos comes out well, but that is more a technique issue. Keep in mind, I basically just take snapshots - I'm not like the rest of you

    It is never surprizing that I get what I want on film. I don't own a digital camera, but have used friends' non-SLR digitals. No amount of staring at that LCD helps me figure out what the photo will really look like printed (or even on a computer screen) because of the constant adjustments the electronics make and the nature of the little screen. I'm not comparing film SLR to digital point-and-shoot either.

    I find the LCD and viewfinders on run-of-the-mill digital cameras do not accurately represent the physical area captured as well as any film camera I've used. Thus, I _have_ to view the image after taking the picture. Even on $20 point-and-shoot film cameras with thumb-wheel film advance, what I see in the viewfinder is what I get in the picture.

    As far as exposure, if I'm in a room with decent light from windows, and I don't use a flash, I get a decent picture all around; interior exposure is good and I can see through the window. I know this, and don't worry about it. With digital, even without flash, sometimes the pictures is the same, sometimes the room is too dark and the view out the window is fine, sometimes the interior is fine and the window is practically black.

    What surprizes me is how, with all the modern technology and computerization, that it's more difficult for me to get what I want just by pointing and shooting without thinking about it.
    Truzi

  6. #16
    David Brown's Avatar
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    I'm constantly surprised!

  7. #17
    NedL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    no so much surprised in getting what i photographed, but surprised that i chose to photograph what i did
    sometimes it takes 6months or a few years to look when i have "distance"
    and then i say " huh, now i know what i was thinking "
    Very good!

    Yes I am very often surprised. Not by what is in the photograph or the exposure but in how well or poorly my print conveys what I saw. John's answer is quite beautiful, if you stop to think about it.

    I also like solargraphy and pinhole photography, where the whole point is to be surprised.

  8. #18
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    I'm always puzzled that with all the care snd thought I put into every shot that I have so few mastwer pieces, and without the effort in the darkroom, I'd have none.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #19
    jwd722's Avatar
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    45 years of "mostly" surprises...

    but I think I'm getting the hang of it!!!

  10. #20
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    I shoot trains at night, using big flash set ups. Keep in mind everything is black when I am there. Let's say I took a shot as the train goes by, and then look at the LCD and see the exposure wasn't quite right or the lighting uneven. Can I simply make adjustments and ask the train to back up and run past me again? No, it has to be perfect the first time. In that regard, it doesn't matter so much if I shoot with my Nikon D7100 or my Rolleiflex.


    Kent in SD

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