Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,502   Posts: 1,543,379   Online: 768
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,601
    Most of my experience was with Tech Pan, which I already used for art forensic photography and special lab applications. I still have some 8x10 sheets on hand. But I had a friend addicted to it for med format field use with very expensive Zeiss lenses; so I ran a number of analogous applications myself to help him perfect his technique, and pretty much figured out how to tame it as much as possible. Yet even with the most appropriate developers, the tonality at the extreme ends of the curve is quite disappointing. Edge effect is also so-so, so even though you can get a lot of detail, it might not look all that sharp. And of course, if you're using a 35mm camera and trying to significantly enlarge this, there will be all kinds of little zits in textureless areas of sky etc. I never understood the appeal of this kind of film for ordinary use.

  2. #12
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,595
    Kodak Technical pan is a film designed decennia ago. And it is not even a microfilm.
    The basic problem of turning such films into films being apt for general pictorial use of course remains.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,601
    It was originally classified like one of their mirofiche films, and then marketed for general use, along with low contrast developers. The pan sensitivity made it more versatile. Academically, makes no difference. I've compared Euro microfilms, and the problems are analogous, even if the minor details differ. I always have gotten a kick out of Kodak's early ads, claiming 4x5 quality with a 35mm camera. Well yeah, if you bought just about the worst 4x5 out there, disabled the movement, had a bad lens, then put the grainiest film on the market in it, and sprinkled some dots of pepper on the film before taking the shot .... But the argument fell apart anyway, because they marketed Tech Pan in large sheets too. It's easy enough to make all these films "work" with the right developer. But the tonality is inevitably disappointing compared to ordinary fine grained films. Most of us aren't old-school spies with a itty bitty camera in a lapel button.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,721
    I thought Tech Pan was a commercial version of something originally for photographing from U-2 planes or something like that, rather than a document/copy/microfilm.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,601
    In ordinary usage, Tech Pan was very high contrast, just like a lith film. But being Pan with extended red sensitivity gave it a whole other range
    of potential applications, especially in forensic and graphics applications, and it was marketed for this kind of commercial versatility. I suspect high-detail general photographic use was an afterthought.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin