Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,901   Posts: 1,584,440   Online: 889
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2

    Question on intentionally overexposing c-41 color film

    Hi everyone, new here!
    I have heard it is generally a good idea to rate color negative film one half to one full stop overexposed (i.e. rating 400 at 200) for better shadow detail, contrast, and color. My question is, is this only beneficial when your lab offers pull processing or is it a good idea to have slightly overexposed color negative even if your lab does not offer special processing?
    (My apologies if this has been asked before, I did search but I couldn't find an answer)

  2. #2
    alienmeatsack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    168
    I think it depends on the film and its age. Some films will change colors/tones/hues a little when over and under exposed... and the push or pull processing also shifts the colors a little as well.

    I usually shoot color film that's new at box speed, only adjusting exposure based on the shot and the amount of shadow it has and hope for the best. When I use expired films or cheap films, I just shoot and enjoy the results I or the lab gets.

    The only way to really tell is to shoot a roll and do some bracketing on shots, make notes of settings, and see what you get. I find some films will vary wildly based on a stop of exposure.

  3. #3
    wiltw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    804
    Color neg film has long been know for its good tolerance of overexposure. So this seems to well complement the color neg intolerance of underexpose, where the colors get 'muddy'. So, by overexposing by 1EV, one can avoid muddy color in the shadows.

    Since the labs automatically print based upon density of the neg, a more dense and slightly overexposed neg simply gets increases exposure of the paper to the negative's darker image, and all is well again.

    Shooting weddings on color neg, I routinely under-rating set my exposures, to avoid muddy colors in the shadows. ISO 160 film might be exposed to EI 100, for example

  4. #4
    adelorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    589
    You would overexpose a stop or so and process normally. No need to pull. I shoot Portra 160 at 125 and process normally, for example. That's a good suggestion to shoot a test roll and bracket some different exposures and see what works best for you.

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,544
    Images
    65
    Generally you should only overexpose by about 1/3 stop and thus a 400 speed film would be 320. However, good results can be obtained by overexposures of 1 - 2 stops. I have posted an exposure series of Portra 160 elsewhere on APUG. It covers a full over and under exposure range.

    PE

  6. #6
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Vic., Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,692
    Images
    15
    An 0.3 stop over-exposure is usually, in my experience, too small and inconsequential to be noticed with the latitude of C41 emulsions, including Portra that I have used. If the question was about transparency film, over- and under-exposure would be a more critical consideration. I would not be concerned about 0.3 or even 0.5, but run a series of tests at 1.5, 2 and 3 stops up and down. Many photographers set their exposure preference based on tests in given lighting conditions e.g. flat/overcast vs bright sun with shadows, and use their standing test results to achieve the outcome based on prevailing conditions.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  7. #7
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,192
    Images
    4
    Over exposing color negative film usually helps to ensure that your shadows have some detail in them. But to be totally honest I have better luck from exposing for the shadows to start with.

    But, try it for yourself. Load your camera up with a roll of your favorite color film, shoot it at box speed. Then load the same film, shoot it one stop over exposed. Have it developed and see if you can tell any difference. I will bet that you can't. My experience is that unless you develop your own film, you won't see much difference.

    Unless you are shooting Ektar 100 of course. The do yourself a favor and get your exposure right. This film does not like under exposure.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2
    Thank you all very much for clearing that up! A lot of helpful advice. I will run some tests and do some bracketing as soon as possible

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    First thing is to know what kind of accuracy your shutter and your meter are giving. Without that, every exposure is presumed inaccurate. Especially the leaf shutters. I haven't found one accurate yet. You need to keep on top of them every minute. On the other hand I have a Nikkormat FT2 that has never been touched for service, and it's dead on the money. Yes that includes Hasselblad. They are way off, too. Without service, you can't say what is "1 stop overexposure". Knowing that and your meter accuracy, 1/3 over on color neg film is optimal.

  10. #10
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,208
    Unless I have a very good reason I always expose professional films at the box speed and rely on the film manufactures knowing the true speed of their products, unless I get consistently underexposed results, only then do I consider adjusting the I.S.O.
    Ben

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin