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  1. #11
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    In the old days, they only had orthochromatic film, no red sensitivity.
    Rick is correct.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #12
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Saw this online a little while back and is a good example of the use of colors on the original adams family set to get good black and white tones when shot.

    http://i.imgur.com/MIV9yAQ.jpg

    Kinda trippy to see it in color.

  3. #13

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    On the early Baird B&W TV models I am sure I read that the presenters had to use green lipstick to make their lips stand out. Could the same apply to still shots and could it be made even darker with red or magenta filters?

    pentaxuser

  4. #14
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    A #66 filter should do the trick. For a more intense effect, a #58 will work quite nicely. Freckles and blemishes may need some cover up, though, as they darken with the green also.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    Saw this online a little while back and is a good example of the use of colors on the original adams family set to get good black and white tones when shot.

    http://i.imgur.com/MIV9yAQ.jpg

    Kinda trippy to see it in color.
    Wow, that looks incredibly garish when one is used to seeing the set in black and white!

  6. #16

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    In order to get the effect of an orthochromatic film you must use a minus-red filter (cyan). A blue or green filter is not going to give the same effect. You want red light to be filtered out but not the other colors. For the color blind film used in early silent films you would use a blue filter as these films were not sensitized to other colors.

    Early experiments in television used a sensor that was also orthochromatic. To compensate makeup that was green not red was used. People looked quit ghastly in person when using it.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    In the old days, they only had orthochromatic film, no red sensitivity.
    +++Ortho
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    In order to get the effect of an orthochromatic film you must use a minus-red filter (cyan). A blue or green filter is not going to give the same effect. You want red light to be filtered out but not the other colors. For the color blind film used in early silent films you would use a blue filter as these films were not sensitized to other colors.
    According to AA's Basic Photo 4, Natural Light Photography, a 38, 38A, or 66 will give a good representation of ortho film. He also says a #66 will give the most satisfactory results with its high green transmission. Although a 65A might be better suited for what your trying, based on Kodak's Pub B-3, and on the old Transmission of Wratten Filters guide.

    Of course, using filters to do what you can with ortho film may seem contrary to the sensible approach, they will work in the absence of ortho film.

    Panchromatic film was introduced around 1905, although it wasn't until the 30s-40s that it gained real acceptance outside cinematic uses.
    Last edited by kintatsu; 12-23-2013 at 02:02 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: My stupidity

  9. #19

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    I was once told that make-up, as well as clothing and even set colours were specifically chosen to look 'right' in B/W. The cinematographers back then had a great eye for how things looked with their particular film stock. The colour publicity shots may have been something separate.

  10. #20
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    Standard trick that I had used in the past, use ortho film to get the almost black lips.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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