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  1. #11
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    A photographer used them as a seagull filter -- the longer exposures got rid of the sea gulls in the air that otherwise looked liked nasty spots in the sky.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Images View Post
    I use ND filters often. It of course depends upon the light. For me it's always the transition zone between light and dark in a scene. If shooting in a direction away from the sun I use standard Grad or ND's in 2 or 3 stop and in both soft and hard edges. If shooting towards the sun I use Reverse Grad or ND's and sometimes even stack those as required.
    As I typically shoot only transparency film the exposure latitude is very narrow and the grads all help work through the shortcomings of the film.
    The attached image was shot with a Reverse ND.
    That's beautiful! Well crafted.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Images View Post
    I use ND filters often. It of course depends upon the light. For me it's always the transition zone between light and dark in a scene. If shooting in a direction away from the sun I use standard Grad or ND's in 2 or 3 stop and in both soft and hard edges. If shooting towards the sun I use Reverse Grad or ND's and sometimes even stack those as required.
    As I typically shoot only transparency film the exposure latitude is very narrow and the grads all help work through the shortcomings of the film.
    The attached image was shot with a Reverse ND.
    Beautiful image. Excuse my ignorance but what is a "Reverse ND"?

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    A Tiffen 82Ø 0.9 (3•) is in my filter wallet but it doesn't get much use — I think I used it twice last October in an outback scene; I prefer to employ metering tricks instead of these.


  5. #15
    Trail Images's Avatar
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    Beautiful image. Excuse my ignorance but what is a "Reverse ND"?
    Thank you for your kind comment on the image.
    I've attached a couple links to Singh Ray filters. The first link shows and outlines what I use for a standard grad or ND. The second link shows the reverse grad style. Both have a bit of difference in the placement and density of the graduation if you will.

    Standard Grad Neutral Density

    Reverse Grad Neutral Density

  6. #16
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    As ever on Apug, you ask a simple question and get TONS of helpful replies. Thanks guys.

  7. #17
    AgX
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    Reverse versus Standard graduated neut. dens. filters:

    -) the reverse version has a maximum density zone in the center, falling off steeply to clear at one side and in a shallow way to grey at the other.

    -) the standard version has the maximum density at one half, falling off at a transition zone at the center to clear at the other half.


    (I just learned about that reverse version today, and am still not sure about its use other than landscapes with the sun just above the horizon.)
    Last edited by AgX; 02-21-2014 at 07:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    It reduces light intensity where camera setting can't go any further.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #19
    Trail Images's Avatar
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    (I just learned about that reverse version today, and am still not sure about its use other than landscapes with the sun just above the horizon.)
    As you've mentioned here Agx, with the sun just above the horizon, is about the only use the grad was developed for, at least as far as I know. My example image was taken at the very beginning of that usage in a sunrise event. I could have used a regular grad in that event to start with, but did not feel comfortable in trying to change to the reverse once the sun had risen.

    It reduces light intensity where camera setting can't go any further.
    Ralph's made the general usage of grads very clear in a one line sentence IMO. Well stated.

  10. #20

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    I want a negative density filter which gives me more light when I put it on the lens.

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