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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    120
    Scanning color negative is rife with difficulties, and even if you have a workflow established there are lots of headaches. Get a scanner (dedicated if you only shoot 35mm, flatbed if you shoot MF + LF also), teach yourself to scan B&W, and then start sludging through the (continually painful) process of scanning color negative. My best results have come when I stick to a single emulsion and get the settings down for it in my scanning software of choice (vuescan).

    For what it's worth, I've had the best results scanning Reala (now discontinued) and Portra 160. Ektar is really hard-- that being said, if you find Superia 200 too subdued, I'd look at Ektar if you want it to really 'pop'.

  2. #12
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    Yeah, that sounds like universally good advice.

    I also find that it helps a lot to scan and lock the base colour for each roll.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2
    First one is dead on what Fuji Superia 200 is supposed to do. That film produces true accurate color frame after frame. The second one the blue tint would have to be corrected in scanning to be sure.

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