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  1. #1
    ericdan's Avatar
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    Does the lab matter for E-6 film?

    I understand that with C-41 a lot depends on the lab you chose and with E-6 it's more 'what you see is what you get'.
    In that case does it matter where I get my E-6 film developed? I guess the chemicals and process is the same?!

    Thanks,
    Eric

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Yes choice of lab matters, but there are good E6 labs around. Look for a good Fuji professional lab as you're in Japan, you need a lab that's maintainining/monitoring it's chemistry properly.

    Welcome to APUG BTW.

    Ian

  3. #3
    ericdan's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot. That's great advice!

  4. #4

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    Both processes, C-41 and E-6, are a standard. They should be run the same way in every laboratory, concerning development of the film. C-41 depends more on the laboratory you chose if you want technicians to print it, because the interpretation of the negative is NOT standard. E-6 slides on the other hand are positive images and can be used as an actual reference for the print to look as closely as possible like the original slide. Obviously not so good laboratory can be less careful on replenishment of the chemistry or film handling (scratches or dirt), but in principle development is the same everywhere.

  5. #5

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    my lab does bigger scratches than your lab...

  6. #6
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Labs can be clumsy and/or careless and crimp or cut the last one or two frames; this has happened to me with both professional and consumer level labs. I've never had a bad experience relating to the actual chemical side of processing; that is to say, quality control and attention to replenishing all chemicals is in place and being adhered to.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #7
    ericdan's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot everyone. I have been looking around for labs that do mail order processing in Japan and found this place
    http://www.toylab.jp/service/

    Has anybody every heard of them before?

  8. #8

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    I worked in Baton Rouge at a lab . Most of my coworker hated me.
    Your E6 was not safe .

  9. #9

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    Tight

    I have been taking film to labs for development since cars had running boards. I have been very unhappy in the past few years concerning the quality of work I have been getting from labs. Some are still fine but others seem to not train their technicians properly and don't much care much quality. This seems to parallel society's attitudes in general. (Try to find an honest tire shop. I found exactly one and have been ripped off more times than I want to count.) You need to find a good lab and get to know the people who work there and the managers. A tight relationship between customer and vendor is a very Japanese way of doing business so they should understand it there. Good luck.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by James in GA View Post
    I worked in Baton Rouge at a lab . Most of my coworker hated me.
    Your E6 was not safe .
    You didn't by chance work at Kadair's, did you? I used them once many years ago while vacationing in Louisiana. Thanks to their efforts, I was scared off Ektachrome (lol) until January of 2011.
    An assortment of F-series Nikons (F to F6, excluding the F4) with quite a few Nikkors, a pair of M6s with some Leitz glass, a pair of 500c/ms with a wide range of Zeiss optics and, just to help keep Duracell solvent, a D800.

    Favourite films: (1). KE ("Kodachrome Era"): 35mm: PKM25 and PKR64, HP5/Tri-X; 120: PKR64, PanF, FP4. (2). PKE ("Post-Kodachrome Era"): (a) 35mm: E100G, HP5 Plus/Tri-X and Delta 3200; (b) 120: E100G, PanF Plus, FP4 Plus, TMax 100.



 

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