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Thread: Sunny 16 rule

  1. #11
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    +1, The human eyes and the brain are very poor instruments to evaluate light because they react too quickly and imperceptibly to changes of light intensity for us to notice them.
    I agree that the human eye cannot detect actual light levels due to the 'automatic exposure' mechanism in the eye. However, we can judge contrast very well by the distinctiveness of shadows.

    As the sun is a constant, the only variable during daylight hours is the amount of diffusion given by the clouds and this can be judged very well by eye.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I agree that the human eye cannot detect actual light levels due to the 'automatic exposure' mechanism in the eye. However, we can judge contrast very well by the distinctiveness of shadows.

    As the sun is a constant, the only variable during daylight hours is the amount of diffusion given by the clouds and this can be judged very well by eye.


    Steve.
    And the amount of the subject in shade, which is what seems to me is often left out by the Sunny 16 rule. Sure the main subject may be in full sun, but it is generally agreed (I'm sure not by every single person though) that you expose negative film for the amount of shadow detail you need. To me, Sunny 16 is more a useful snapshot rule where the nuiances of shadow detail may not matter, or for transparnency film. 1/500 @ f11 is about the least exposure I ever use for Tri-x (ISO 400) in full sun, though I can picture situations where f16 would be adequate. So my rule of thumb is Sunny 11. Doesn't have the same ring to it, but it gives me exposures I like better. I actually am often likely to give more than that in many cases. And more diffusion often doesn't change that exposure for me since it often doesn't change the shadow level.

    As has been pointed out, the differences between the old and new shutter speeds are small and ignorable. Thinking in half stops for aperture is perfectly adequate. For me, when in between, give move the dial in the direction of exposure rather than less, at least if using Sunny 16.

    To be clear, I'm not disagreeing with anyone, just expressing my feeling about the adequacy of the Sunny 16 rule, and how that impacts the OP's question.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    the way it was worded was difficult to understand
    but the end answer isn't very difficult to figure out ... i think ?
    No the answer is easy but I am wondering which method would a teacher teach students to do this? So many ways to figure out the answer which way it was taught?

  4. #14

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    It's really very simple.

    Indoors with ISO 800 film: 1/50 sec at f/2.8

    Outdoors with sunny 16 rule and ISO 800 film: 1/800 sec at f/16

    1/50 sec to 1/800 sec is 4 stops (1/100, 1/200, 1/400, 1/800)

    f/2.8 to f/16 is 5 stops (4, 5.6, 8, 11,16)

    4 = 5 = 9 stops darker

  5. #15
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    It's esy. All you have t to do is multiply the indoor exposurewith the temperature difference to get he outdoor exposure;in F for asa and in Cfor iso.
    Last edited by RalphLambrecht; 03-02-2014 at 05:57 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
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  6. #16
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    It's esy. all you have tto do is multiply the indoor exposurewith the temperature difference to get he outdoor exposure;in F for asa and in Cfor iso.
    Thanks Ralph I new there was a way.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  7. #17
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    It stands to reason if "sunny 16" was so accurate and produced such perfect exposures nobody would ever have ever invented light meters.
    Ben

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    It stands to reason if "sunny 16" was so accurate and produced such perfect exposures nobody would ever have ever invented light meters.
    It does? People don't take pictures other than in the sun?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Crabtree View Post
    It does? People don't take pictures other than in the sun?
    Somebody is being sarcastic here.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    It's esy. All you have t to do is multiply the indoor exposurewith the temperature difference to get he outdoor exposure;in F for asa and in Cfor iso.
    Ah, but don't forget about the difference in color temperature between inside and outside, too!
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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