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  1. #1
    ericdan's Avatar
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    Tri-X 400 at the beach?

    I usually shoot 35mm Tri-X 400 pushed to 1600iso with my GR1v.
    The GR only goes to shutter speed of 1/500th so I use an orange or 2 stop ND filter during the day.
    I develop with ID-11 (1+1) for 13 1/4 mins. I really like the grain it gives me.

    We've been having good weather here in Tokyo and I was planning to head down to the beach for the weekend.
    I am now wondering if I should be using a different film or just rate it slower.

    I've shot it at 400 ISO with flash indoors before with mixed results.
    I know that trying it out is the best way to figure this out, but I any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    What's wrong with shooting it at 400? It's beautiful.

  3. #3
    ericdan's Avatar
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    Nothing. I am just worried that 1/500th of a second won't be fast enough for the beach.

  4. #4
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Remember Sunny 16: it'll get you f/16 at 1/500th if you shoot it at 400. If you want a more open aperture, or a slower shutter speed, then you'll need the ND filter. An EI of 1600 would definitely be too fast.

  5. #5

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    Honestly, I would find Tri-X, even at 400ISO, a bit fast for use at a beach during the day, unless you can get very high shutterspeeds. I'd get some FP4+ / Foma 100 (tradition grain) or Delta 100 / Tmax 100 (t-grain). If you are pushing to 1600 because you like grain, you might look at Foma 400 (I haven't used it really, but it is grainier than tri-x at equivalent speeds.)

  6. #6

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    news

    When news photographers got their hands on Tri-X (the new version that came out around 1960 or so) they used it for everything, including at the beach. Before that we used Plus-X for most stuff but Tri-X for low light shots. The grain in the older Tri-X was like golf balls. I'm talking for 35mm and 120.

  7. #7
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    With bright sun on sand (or snow) both Kodak and the sunny 16 rule recommend F22 at 1/500. That is as far as that camera will stop down. So if you want to shoot at 1600 you need at least two stops of filtration.

    That being said it is pretty hard to go wrong with Tri-X. I would imagine you could just shoot away and it would all work out.

  8. #8

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    Tri-X is god-tier black and white film but a bit fast for a beach scene, I would use Tmax 100 or something similar
    5x7 Eastman-Kodak kit / B+M 135mm Zeiss Tessar + Compur Deckel
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  9. #9

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    I'm not sure what development regime you use, but EI 1600 with TX is going to be mighty high contrast no matter what you do. I can see where that might be a desirable beach aesthetic, and if you like your results, then there it is; but, yes, plain arithmetic says you're going to need a couple of stops of filtration---more if you want the flexibility to open up the aperture beyond f/16 or f/22.

    But it's not too clear what the intent of your question is---of course, you can use a slower film, you can rate your Tri-X at box speed, you can lower the effective speed with filters, but you know all those things and I'm not sure if anyone else can really tell you how to choose among them. But if you really want the distinctive look of TX under a significant push, that seems to eliminate the first two options.

    If you can stack the filters without too much vignetting, you might use the orange filter *and* ND2, for an EI around 200. Even that isn't going to buy you too much flexibility in exposure, though; on a beach in full sun, I'd normally be thinking of an EI around 50.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  10. #10

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    There is a problem when using the fastest shutter speed on any camera. Typically they are off by -20 to -40% from their marked value. This has nothing to due with the maker or quality of manufacture. it is solely a matter of physics. So a speed of 1/500 sec may actually be only 1/300 to 1/400 of a sec. This will only acerbate the problem.

    There are several things that can be done, alone or in combination. None of which may appeal to you.

    1. Don't push the film.
    2. Use a stronger ND filter.
    3. Use a slower film like FP4+.
    4. Use a speed reducing developer like Perceptol.

    BTW, you may like the grain at an EI of 1600 but you are sacrificing shadow detail and optimal results from 400TX. Kodak clearly states this in their publication, read Push Processing in http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4017/f4017.pdf
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 04-21-2014 at 12:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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