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Thread: snow problem

  1. #31

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    All white people carry an approximate grey card around with them. It's called your hand. If you take the light reading of your skin it will be approximately correct for snow in the same light. It is a useful trick for a lot of exposure problems. For dark skin the palm is still light so it might work, but I'm not in a position to test. Otherwise I find 2 stops bias is a bit much. I'd go for 1.5 to 1 2/3 and, yes, a mild yellow filter.

    David.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by dr bob
    ... with a Wratten 47 (blue) and the shadows popped out perfectly.
    Very blue that 47. I'd worry about color fidelity; black reds and
    greens and everything in between. A good example though of
    contrast control through use of a filter. Perhaps a light cyan
    or magenta would help to preserve color fidelity and let
    the blue through. Dan

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu
    Very blue that 47. I'd worry about color fidelity; black reds and
    greens and everything in between. A good example though of
    contrast control through use of a filter. Perhaps a light cyan
    or magenta would help to preserve color fidelity and let
    the blue through. Dan
    Quite right! When I began to photograph, about 60 years ago, I used orth film and usually had good results. If I had a cyan filter it would have been used to make the image in question. The point is the use of a blue reducing filter may not always be the best choice depending on the circumstances. Sunlit snow scenes usually have high contrast to begin with so I don't see the point of increasing it further.

    I think the best advise given is to open aperture 1-1/2 to 2 stops to record the shadow detail then reduce development to control the negative contrast and highlights. And always think!
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

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