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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    If the subject you are shooting is in shade and you open up 2 stops to make that look right, then yes the skies will be 2 stops overexposed in relation to the rest of the picture and they will get blown out.

    But if you are looking at a normal shot already and take it 2 stops overexposed, everything is overexposed proportionally and the skies are no worse - in relationship to the rest of the picture.
    Bill, I like your black and white idea.
    On your second comment, I agree that its all overexposed proportionally but the difference with skies is that the detail is almost gone, if not totally gone.
    “Photography is a love affair with life.” Burk Uzzle.

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Fill flash with focal plane shutter cameras is always a challenge.

    And it is even a bit of challenge with leaf shutter cameras.

    You need powerful flashes, and you are forced to work in restrictive circumstances.

    Reflectors make way more sense.

    By the way, I don't think the situation you describe is a fill-flash situation. If your entire main subject is in a large shadow, but you also want to record properly a fully illuminated background, you need to add enough light to replace the shadowed area with full light. That requires movie set lighting, not fill flash.

    Fill flash is intended to fill small areas of shadow that are surrounded by fully illuminated areas. You use it to soften harsh, contrasty lighting, or to provide some localized front lighting to a predominantly backlit subject.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    That requires movie set lighting, not fill flash.
    Not exactly Hollywood budget level stuff, but I find myself doing more and more shooting like this...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I shoot digital when I have to (most of those shots end up here) and film (occasionally one of those shots ends up here) when I want to.

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by omaha View Post
    Not exactly Hollywood budget level stuff, but I find myself doing more and more shooting like this...

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    But note, however, that that is with a leaf shutter.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15
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    Hi alab!

    In order for you to understand your camera better, this is the way the EM works with the SB-E:
    Nikon tried to simplify flash photography for beginners by making the EM to send the aperture in use on the lens to the flash provided you have an AI lens like the Series E made for the EM. The SB-E has 3 working apertures that you can see on the diagram on the back of the flash. Provided you use those apertures on the lens, the flash and the EM synchronises the aperture in use. It is impossible to do fill-in flash by selecting a different aperture on the flash than the one you have set on the lens.
    The biggest problem is that most Nikon flashes made after the SB-E will make the EM to default to the 1/90th shutter speed and there's no way of selecting a different shutter speed. As soon as the EM senses a compatible flash it will lock the shutter at the flash sync speed.
    In order to be able to use a flash in daylight with the EM, you have to remove that automation from the flash side. If you look at the hotshoe on a EM, you see there is 3 contacts, a larger central one for the X sync, and 2 small ones: one for the ready light and to oblige the shutter speed to 1/90th and a second one for sending the aperture set on the lens to the flash.
    You'll need a simpler auto flash with just a central contact to do this, like the Vivitar 283:
    On your situation of a sunny day, I would use a slow film, say ISO 100 or lower. Set the aperture on the lens that will give a shutter speed of 1/90th or less. Say the EM is happy with f16 in this case. Set the auto flash to an aperture 2 stops lower, i.e. f8 and try to keep your distance to the subject within the range that is shown on the flash for f16. the result is that the EM will ignore the flash and expose the background correctly. Your child will be have just the right amount of light to fill any shadows. You can try a stronger ration and only set the flash to f11.
    That's the way I would do with my EMs.
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  6. #16
    rince's Avatar
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    I second getting a light meter that measures flash. Getting enough output out of a small on camera flash to compensate for a sunny day might be tricky though, especially when you have to balance color temperatures with gels. If using more complicated setups with larger flash heads is not an option I would use a reflector instead of the fill flash. This should at least bring you reasonably close and allow you to adjust for the exposure difference during printing.
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  7. #17

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    Your two exposures are independent - first work out the exposure that you want for your subject - which will be illuminated by the flash. This will come out to be a particular f-stop, and the subject exposure will be pretty independent of the shutter speed. Now that you know what aperture you will be using, figure out what the normal exposure for the background is using this f-stop. Let's say that you end up deciding to use f16 for your subject, and for the background to be properly exposed you want 1/30 at f16. Usually you will want some separation between the subject and the background, so to make the background darker, just increase the shutter speed - to 1/60 or even more, if you want the background brighter, then slow down the shutter speed.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Fill flash with focal plane shutter cameras is always a challenge.

    And it is even a bit of challenge with leaf shutter cameras.

    You need powerful flashes, and you are forced to work in restrictive circumstances.

    Reflectors make way more sense.

    By the way, I don't think the situation you describe is a fill-flash situation. If your entire main subject is in a large shadow, but you also want to record properly a fully illuminated background, you need to add enough light to replace the shadowed area with full light. That requires movie set lighting, not fill flash.

    Fill flash is intended to fill small areas of shadow that are surrounded by fully illuminated areas. You use it to soften harsh, contrasty lighting, or to provide some localized front lighting to a predominantly backlit subject.
    +1

    strong flash will fix your situation, or getting a pc cord and an off camera flash closer to your subject ...
    there is a lumedyne kit being sold in the classifieds currently, and it might be the solution to your problem ..

  9. #19
    omaha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    But note, however, that that is with a leaf shutter.


    And I'm putting your phrase "movie set lighting" into the book.
    I shoot digital when I have to (most of those shots end up here) and film (occasionally one of those shots ends up here) when I want to.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by alabdali View Post
    Bill, I like your black and white idea.
    On your second comment, I agree that its all overexposed proportionally but the difference with skies is that the detail is almost gone, if not totally gone.
    My idea is not conventional, overexposure degrades some image qualities, so there isn't a lot of lore saying overexpose on purpose to solve fixed flash sync speed. I'm talking about taking advantage of the very long 'straight-line' section of modern film's response to light.

    What you're thinking about skies won't be made worse with overexposure. If the skies were going to blow out with a normal exposure, they would blow out just the same with overexposure. But if the skies were going to be OK. They would still be OK with overexposure. On a contact print, sure the shot would look overexposed. But when you print down an overexposed negative... the result is the same as a properly exposed negative (except for degraded sharpness, resolution and grain - if you care about those qualities don't take my advice here).

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