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  1. #1

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    Nine Zones With One Click of the Shutter

    Is there any way to do that? Is there any target
    made for that purpose? I'd like to take up less
    than nine frames of film. Dan

  2. #2

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    Stouffer step wedges....

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    Stouffer step wedges....
    That won't do. I've in mind a white to gray
    target perhaps two by three feet. Nine stops may
    be more than possible. I may play with some paint.
    Even five stops would be helpfull. Dan

  4. #4
    mikewhi's Avatar
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    With 4x5, I get 6 zones per sheet. If you shoot this, I can tell you how I do it. I don't shoot step wedges. Making a target with 5 or 9 patches exactly 1 stop apart will be a pain. You might try putting a Zone V negative in the enlarger and making 4"x4" exposures, each one stop apart and see how something like that works.

    -Mike

  5. #5
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    Try the grayscale patches in a Kodak Professional Photoguide or pick up their reflective gray scale target ("control patches"?).

  6. #6
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Dan,

    Jorge's suggestion is a bit brief, and he's assuming you'll intuit how to use the wedge. You don't say why this won't work for you, so I'll assume you don't understand one possible use of the wedge and jump in with that. Forgive me if you know this already. There's not enough information in the thread for me to determine whether you're aware of this way of using the wedge.

    You don't have to shoot the Stouffer wedges at 1:1 through the lens. You can use a transmission wedge, put it on top of the film in the holder, then expose in camera to an evenly lit uniform target with the camera focused at infinity, but at 5 stops more exposure than your meter reads for that target. I use a plastic diffusion disk over the lens for even illumination. This 5 stop increase over the meter reading puts the "middle gray" of the step wedge at the right level of exposure, and the other levels "fall" into place. You're basically making a contact print of the Stouffer wedge in camera. You can get 1/2 stop or 1/3 stop increment wedges.

    You can then contact or projection print the resulting negative on whatever material you use for display to calibrate from start to finish.

    Lee

  7. #7
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L

    expose in camera to an evenly lit uniform target with the camera focused at infinity, but at 5 stops more exposure than your meter reads for that target. I use a plastic diffusion disk over the lens for even illumination. This 5 stop increase over the meter reading puts the "middle gray" of the step wedge at the right level of exposure, and the other levels "fall" into place.
    Lee
    I understand "Place and Fall" but would metering a gray card and shooting at that exposure be different than your opening up 5 stops?

  8. #8
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Bruce,

    The Stouffer wedges are 10 stops in increments of 1/2 or 1/3 stops. Think of it as putting a stepped neutral density filter over the film inside the camera. You have to overexpose 5 stops from the "flat field" you're metering outside the camera in order for the middle of the neutral density range on the step wedge to produce a medium gray on the film. If you just shot at the metered reading, you'd end up with the thinnest density in the step wedge registering slightly above medium gray, and the denser sections of the wedge would all fall below "Zone V". Opening up 5 stops from the meter reading (which doesn't account for the neutral density in the wedge in contact with the film) puts the middle of the Stouffer scale on Zone V, so you get the full range of the step wedge on film, or at least what part of that range the film/developer can handle.

    Lee

  9. #9
    BarrieB's Avatar
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    Not owning a 'Step-Wedge' having adjusted the exp. by 5 stops I assume that if this was done on several sheets of film one could then test various Developers / time combinations !!!!
    Could you use this method to obtain ' Personal Film Speed ' ?

  10. #10
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L
    Bruce,
    .................
    Opening up 5 stops from the meter reading (which doesn't account for the neutral density in the wedge in contact with the film) puts the middle of the Stouffer scale on Zone V, so you get the full range of the step wedge on film, or at least what part of that range the film/developer can handle.

    Lee
    " Stouffer scale on Zone V" .....I got it now. Makes sense.

    Thanks

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