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Thread: visualisation

  1. #11

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    It comes about thru combination of alot of factors. Photography teaches us to look/see images that most walk on past. Larger the format, the more likely you'll slow down & take the time to analyze a potential image. Knowing your turf - when is a certain view at its best & the patience to wait.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  2. #12

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    I can not say practice makes perfect but I can say practice makes more proficient.

  3. #13
    Bill Mobbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alien
    Maybe I should say that I mostly take pictures of people...thats why I mentioned Doisneau. I think that visualising a landscape for example is easier, because you can take your time and 'draw the picture in your mind'.
    But when you run around on the streets for example...well, I try my best, but most shots will not be good....
    I am for the most part a street photographer and I feel to compare the fine art photographer or those who use LF cameras to the street shooter is like comparing apples and oranges.
    I don't have time to take meter readings and then study the result and make futher adjustments for tone and light and another pre-visualising pause before make the photograph. I do a pre-visualising pause of about a half second to consider if anything is in the viewfinder worth paying one frame of film for. I'm always watching the action on the street, I'm always ready, I'm always willing to take a chance.
    That's what makes street photography exciting. All the things that fine art and LF photographers do is what makes life exciting for them as well.
    "Nobody is perfect! But even among those that are perfect, some are more perfect than others." Walt Sewell 1947

  4. #14

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    I visualise my landscape photos nearly every time - sometimes months in advance. They are colour, but that doesn't matter - I know what I'm going to get in my final print before I release the shutter.

    (Previsualisation implies something before visualisation - it's a grammatic sticking point I've had for a while. Oh well, I know what you mean, anyway.)
    Graeme Hird
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    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    (Previsualisation implies something before visualisation - it's a grammatic sticking point I've had for a while. Oh well, I know what you mean, anyway.)
    There was a semantical discuss on an earlier thread about the word Previsualisation - there is no such word. There is visualize and prevision. To visualize is to see an image in the mind, prevision is to see an image that is a future image in the mind. There is nothing in the definition of visualize to include future images, so I prefer the word prevision for what I do. One can visualize many images, including entirely fanciful ones that cannot come to be in any physical form. Prevision includes images that do come to be by definition. So, when I see an image in my mind that I intend to make with the camera and darkroom, I call it prevision.

    -Mike

  6. #16
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    Your inability to pre-visualize is a personal failing that might be remedied by some ritual, like viewing through a filter, but more likely is simply beyond your artistic potential.

    (Jdef inspired me to point this out.)

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi
    .....So, when I see an image in my mind that I intend to make with the camera and darkroom, I call it prevision.
    -Mike
    And for me, that's visualisation. I visualise my final image, whether I am about to expose my film or it's something I have in mind for three months down the track. Whatever - what we name the process doesn't matter, as long as we are capable of controlling our final image.

    Cheers,
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  8. #18
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    artistic inability

    Quote Originally Posted by chuck94022
    Your inability to pre-visualize is a personal failing that might be remedied by some ritual, like viewing through a filter, but more likely is simply beyond your artistic potential.

    (Jdef inspired me to point this out.)

    Thanks to all to reply to my question, it pointed out several things for me:

    1. everybody seems to have a different degree of 'visualisation' - depending on the subject they are photographing, and also on the photography experience.

    2. practice helps (I sort of knew that before, but it is always good to remind oneself of that)

    3. Slowing things down helps, too!

    The comment quoted above made me smile, as I never saw myself as an artist. I think it comes down to what you want to achieve with your photography. For me personally it was primarily a hobby to get my mind off things, and secondly a diary type activity - recording what happens around me. My biggest ambition in this respect is to present my two girls with a nice book full of pictures of themselves when they reach 18 - I have no ambition to go much further than this sort of thing.

    So Chuck is probably correct in saying that this is beyond my artistic capability - but then I must have some visualisation in me, otherwise I would not be able to produce any reasonable pictures intentionally. Well, define reasonable then...

    One thing seems clear...slowing down will help the visualisation. Therefore I will try to make an effort in slowing down things and practise. I will probably help that I have bought a Sinar Norma 4x5, and I can't wait to get going with it.

    And if I don't improve...well, at least I have enjoyed myself, and that is what this is all about!

    Ansgar

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    In other cases I have to "work" the image by making metering descisions that will affect the outcome of the negative and subsequently the print. A good example of this is my Convento de la Santa Cruz small hallway. I could have metered and develop this negative so that both the near and far had similar values, but I wanted an illusion of progresive light from dark to light, so I metered in a way that I would have those values in the negative.
    Jorge, I really like the way your Convento de la Santa Cruz hallway turned out - your decision to make the light progressive in the image was an excellent one. Could you describe in more detail how you metered to achieve the end result? Thanks!

  10. #20
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    I try to visualize regardless of format. Sometimes the negative surprises me while printing.

    I never have done much street photography, but I did shoot a lot of sports for a newspaper. I would try to visualize my shots then, too, as I had only a 35mm camera and no motor drive. I would be sure I knew the sport and the teams well enough to anticipate where action would take place, then check the light and focus for that place. I got the shot most of the time, and every one of those shots was framed well enough, in focus and exposed properly. In reading about W. Eugene Smith, I think he used a similar technique for many of his photographs.

    I think that, regardless of format and subject matter, you simply must have a lot of experience with your materials so that you can anticipate what's needed to get a printable negative.
    juan

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