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  1. #11
    Ole
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    Back in the really old days when film was slow and cameras heavy, they used a trick which is somewhat similar to what you see on my avatar: The heavier the camera, the less it shakes (up to a limit). There was one ship's photographer who added several pounds of lead to his camera to make it heavier for hand-held shooting...
    Last edited by Ole; 09-01-2005 at 03:17 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Too many spelling mistakes for the top of the page :p
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I like the Clyde Butcher solution. I think he has a 12 foot fiberglass surveyor's tripod and a tall ladder that he can use in the swamps.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #13
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    There was one ship's photographer who added several pounds of lead to his camera to make it heavier for hand-held shooting...
    A good impoverished film student trick that I've seen for handheld shooting with a lightweight camera is to use a monopod (not resting on the ground) with a 5 pound barbell weight on the bottom.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #14
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    I used to bolt a chunk of brass to the base of my Leica when I shot theatre. Worked as described.

    Helen: I was kidding about the gyro stabilizer.
    Peter: I was kidding about the gyro stablizer.

    There is always a place where it pays to change film size. When the water's too deep to sink legs, then 120 gives you almost two stop of shutter speed, which gives you 1/4 the motion blur.

    On the other hand, with judicious development, in particular reduced agitation, you can always push TMY 2 stops ! No real grain increase, while keeping a long straight line !
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  5. #15
    resummerfield's Avatar
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    I'll second David's idea of the monopod. Just sink an appropriately long 2x4 into the water till it touches bottom, and place the camera on it handheld.
    —Eric

  6. #16

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    Large format and the pontoon boat

    One of my best shots of all time was taken out of a moving motor boat with a speed graphic. It is not razor sharp, but people like it better than any of my others, it sells before anything. I can't remember the film, probably super XX or Royal pan, and a pretty fast shutter speed.

    And- it was hand held. I took it in the 50's

  7. #17
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    For what it is worth, I once had to shoot interior construction damage photo's in a water filled railroad tunnel. The water was eight feet or so deep, I placed my Davis and Sanford tripod legs into 10 foot sections of electrical conduit. I Paddled a rubber one man raft to the spot, then set up my rig. The regular head worked normally but only supported a B&J 5x7 camera. The tunnel was standard guage, so the make shift tripod legs worked by standing on a nearly flat grade under the water. The conduit was about an inch and three quarters I.D. as I remember and good old 100 mph tape held the two together. I used a simular rig with a ladder at one time to do some telephoto images for the Denver Bronco's. Used 35mm for this however.

  8. #18

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    Are you problems transverse or longitudinal or both? Dan

  9. #19
    PeterDendrinos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu
    Are you problems transverse or longitudinal or both? Dan
    What about oblique?

    I would expect movement issues to affect all plains. A couple of the above suggestions have me thinking. Ladders and or very tall tripods. Now I’m stuck with where to find such a critter and or exactly what am I looking for. I can see where a tall ladder with a mount on top could come in hand in other places as well. Might have to customize a ladder for a river bed so it does not sink however.

    Pete
    "…Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action."

    Frank Tibolt

    WWW.DENDRINOS FINE ART.COM

  10. #20
    glbeas's Avatar
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    What I read of Clyde Butcher, he would set the tripod up on the site he wanted to shoot, weighted down, and leave it for several days so it would settle to a stable point. Must have been a bear pulling it back out of the muck after shooting.
    Gary Beasley

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