Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,763   Posts: 1,484,033   Online: 1265
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Bucks County PA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    113

    Problems shooting river scenes -morning fog

    I have been unsuccessful in capturing fog using tri-x 400/120, which I rate at 400 and develop in D-76 1:1 for 13 1/4 minutes with agitation for the first minute, followed by each minute thereafter for 10 seconds. I use a medium yellow filter. The time is usually 10 minutes before sun rise to about 1 hour after sunrise. I am almost always shooting to the south.

    Would a different filter help? Any other ideas. Thanks

  2. #2
    SuzanneR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,715
    Images
    135
    I would try rating Tri-X at 200, and adjust your development accordingly. A little extra exposure, and a little less development might get you a better negative.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,837
    You may also try shooting without the filter since you want to record a low contrast scene. Possibly use a light blue?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,599
    Images
    116
    There is another thread in this section about capturing fog, it might be worthwhile to read.

  5. #5
    smieglitz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,862
    Images
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne Revy
    I would try rating Tri-X at 200, and adjust your development accordingly. A little extra exposure, and a little less development might get you a better negative.
    I would do just the opposite of what is suggested here.

    You are dealing with a low contrast subject and lighting situation. That's textbook for pushing your film by underexposing (rating the film at a higher ISO like 800 or 1600) and extending the development to increase contrast.

    The pulling will only increase your problem of low contrast, which is why I presume you are using the yellow filter in the first place. Pulling is reserved for high contrast situations such as bright sunny days, night scenes, etc.

    Try pushing the film two stops without the filter.

    Joe

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,599
    Images
    116
    Pulling in general is a bad idea, you lose your local contrast. With modern films having the dynamic range that they have it's usually better to simply shoot it and process it normally. If you have a really contrasty scene with overly dark shadows you can always try some pre-exposure to give some shadow detail and values.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Bucks County PA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    113
    Yes. That is why I have used a yellow filter. I will try pushing next time. Is there anything unique to fog vis. the angle of the sun, or is it handled like any other somewhat sidelit scene, in terms of getting detail in fog?

  8. #8
    SuzanneR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,715
    Images
    135
    I've got this backwards! I should have read the original post more carefully, since you are shooting about ten minutes before the sun rises, yes... yes... push the film.

    Quick question though... if you were to shoot a scene, say an hour after sunrise, with low morning fog, in a valley or over a river with a clear bright sun coming up, what would be the best way to meter and rate the film.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    123
    It would help me to better advise you if I knew exactly in what way you feel you have been unsuccessful.

    Has the fog disappeared from your photograph? Or is the problem that your picture is foggy?

    I have done lots of fog pictures in color, primarily because the client wanted pictures of the fog. Removing it with filtration seemed counterproductive to the assignment. And enhancing its density, unnecessary.

    One problem with b&w is that it functions as a result of a key light (the sun) which provides texture, plus a fill light which opens the shadows. Remove the key light and you have no detail. And nothing from Tiffen will fix that.

    This is why a field of snow on an overcast day has no hills and dales. Just pure paper white. And burning in gives you only pure gray mush. Same with a foggy scene: no detail, no texture.

    My experience with fog is that it doesn't sit around in big white piles like 800 pounds of Cool Whip. In fact, it is not actually visible. The only visible effect is to remove detail in relation to its distance from the camera. A tree in front of a house becomes a tree in front of an off-white background.

    The major advantage to fog is its ability to remove unwanted detail, like power lines travelling through the virgin forest. Or graffiti on an old train bridge. But aside from removing detail, it is not actually visible as an object in itself.

    If you want dramatic, phoney fog, rent a Mole Richardson fog machine from a cine supplier in Hollywood. It will spray out liquid "fog juice" through a basket of dry ice which cools the white fog/smoke and makes it hang as small dense puffy clouds in the air. This effect, from the movies, is perhaps what you were expecting, not real fog in its natural state?

  10. #10
    gnashings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,376
    Images
    17
    So... are you basically saying that fog the way we see it - lovely, rolling, blanket of intangible mist - cannot be cought on B&W film?(other than as a lack of detail over distance?)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin