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  1. #11
    CPorter's Avatar
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    You could expose each frame to allow for your desired shadow detail, then provide minus development. High contrast frames might well be doable and provide an acceptable print and lower contrast frames might doable might be improved by printing with a higher contrast filter.

    I use the multiple 120 back system, I have four backs labled "normal", "minus", "plus", and "compensating". And, I generally try to expose a full roll of 10 frames on the same subject, varying the camera perspective and shadow placements---- I try not have any one roll with different subjects, lighting, etc...but it is sometimes hard to do.

    CP

  2. #12
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    Thanks for the replies everyone - pretty much as I thought. Some interesting ideas.

    Thanks,

    Matt

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    For 35mm and 120, I use a "half-fast" adaptation of the Zone System, and usually make no attempt to adjust development from "normal". Essentially, I do Zone-style spot metering of each scene, and then "place" Zone V based on whether I want to give precedence to shadows or highlights.
    That's exactly my approach Ralph... I tested my film/dev combination to get N and I just use the zone system for metering. My contrast control is done with VC paper.

    I'm thinking of buying a second body for colour neg as often I find an image that doesn't work in mono that would be great in colour. I've though about using that for a N+/- B/W roll too.

    ..Matt

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    It is simple to build a single negative curve that allows full exposure, correct local contrast, and a long straight line to hold a 14 stop scale.
    [snip]
    Attached are two examples of this 35mm system, a single negative type designed to ZS principles. The first, Rosa Park's Bus is an N-4 scene. The second, APUG's esteemed mrcallow, an N-1. Both printed on normal paper, with different paper developers. Both, straight prints, and rich detail in large prints.

    .
    That sounds like it could be what I need. Is there a simple explanation of what 'N' is, and how you build the single negative curve? I've been reading about doing film tests with -1, normal and +1 exposure, then -1, normal and +1 development and deciding which gives you the shadow and highlight detail you want for a particular film, but first I want to make sure that I've got the hang of basic exposure.

    As an almost complete novice I wouldn't be confident about metering either of those scenes. I assume that if I understand the methodology I would understand how to do that.

  5. #15
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    My practice used to be *develop for the most contrasty scene on the roll then use paper grades and developers to control contrast on the flatter negs* but since I started using Pyrocat HD, I find the compensation and highlight control gained from this developer means I have settled on a standard time for each film, no matter the conditions. this works out really well for me.

  6. #16

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    As 35mm film can be "midroll" loaded and unloaded from camera, you mark one roll for normal development, one roll for N-1, etc... Then when you shoot scene which will require normal development load that film, when you shoot N-1 unload previous film and load N-1 marked film, etc... For 120 film it is easy if you have camera with changeable backs. But if you shoot with something like Yashica MAT 124, my guess is that you shoot same roll for one scene, different views etc and develop it as it is needed. Or to restrict yourself to shoot only, for example, N-1 developing needed scenes, and forget other scenes.

    And as I see there are better ideas said earlier...

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