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  1. #1

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    recommend a low contrast color film

    hi
    I am new to this forum

    I am trying to use a lower contrast film ( neg or trans )
    on some very high contrast situation, deep shadows
    but stark and bright sunlight


    I have been told b&W will do the job, but I am keen on colour films.

    whats your recommendation ?
    Show some samples if you could

    thanks

  2. #2
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    A slow portrait film: Kodak Portra 160, Fuji NPS, Agfa portrait 160.

    Exose generously for the shadows, the film s can handle it.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  3. #3
    Imke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    A slow portrait film: Kodak Portra 160, Fuji NPS, Agfa portrait 160.
    Fuji NPH 400 is softer than all of these in my experience.

  4. #4
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Kodak's Ektachrome 64T is the lowest contrast, longest scaled color film manufactured today. Fuji 64T has a little more contrast. Portra 160 has a lot more.

  5. #5
    Helen B's Avatar
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    I hesitate to ask this question, but what are you going to do with the film after it has been developed? This has quite an important bearing on the choice of film, and what the usable 'contrast' of it is. I find that Kodak Ultra 100 has about the longest scale, with the comparatively new Fuji Pro 160S (replacement for NPS) being similar.

    Overexposure helps with colour neg, because a lot of colour neg films show a gentle contrast reduction before hitting their effective shoulder.

    There is a low contrast Kodak motion picture stock that is very tempting, if only it didn't need special development to get rid of the rem-jet: 5299 Vision2 HD. It has a comfortable fourteen stops of range.

    If you follow the link in my signature you should see a number of examples of Ultra 100. I haven't put a lot of Pro 160S stuff up yet.

    Best,
    Helen

  6. #6
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Hat's Off to Helen. Looks like new Fuji Pro 160 is the winner.
    Here are some curves:
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  7. #7
    Imke's Avatar
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    Gee whiz, do I stand corrected!!

  8. #8
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Helen,

    What do you consider the "sweet spot" for EI with the Fuji Pro 160S?

    Thanks,
    Lee

  9. #9
    jd callow's Avatar
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    I would consider over exposing and under developing. 14 stops of information won't fit on any paper I am aware of, you can flatten a scene out pretty well by overexposing by two or three stops and underdevelop the film by a stop or two. It would require some experimentation.

    *

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcallow
    I would consider over exposing and under developing. 14 stops of information won't fit on any paper I am aware of, you can flatten a scene out pretty well by overexposing by two or three stops and underdevelop the film by a stop or two. It would require some experimentation.
    Can you do this with colour neg and /or reversal film? I thought that some pushing was possible with some colour neg films but not pulling which is what under developing is or is it?

    I'd welcome clarification as to what's possible. Thanks

    Pentaxuser

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