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  1. #21
    Lachlan Young's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil
    Andy, again I'm in agreement with you (sigh) as I don't think the copying of intellectual property is a good idea in general.

    Martin, nice example of a night shot in your posted image. One thing I've noticed in my night scenes is that a tighter aperture seems to give those hot light sources a bit more definition. I've done similar exposures with a light source in the frame and the best results seem to come from a small aperture. There is less "bleeding" of the light into other parts of the shot. This could be a function of the film I used and not the aperture, but I don't know. I do like the textures and composition in your shot. Very well done. tim
    It all depends on your lens how sharply the light sources are defined and how good the flare control is - for example the Noct-Nikkor's aspherical front element was designed to reduce flare from light sources. Strangely my £70 secondhand Zuiko 50mm f1.4 lens seems to a better job of controlling flare wide open than all the pictures I have seen that were taken with a Noct Nikkor...

    Hope this helps,

    Lachlan

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil
    Andy, again I'm in agreement with you (sigh) as I don't think the copying of intellectual property is a good idea in general.
    SNIP

    tim
    Thats why I put in the (Ailsa ? )

    But if you put something on the Web you must realize that it may be downloaded and printed for private use.
    Cheers Søren
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    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

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  3. #23
    Martin Liew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil
    Martin, nice example of a night shot in your posted image. One thing I've noticed in my night scenes is that a tighter aperture seems to give those hot light sources a bit more definition. I've done similar exposures with a light source in the frame and the best results seem to come from a small aperture. There is less "bleeding" of the light into other parts of the shot. This could be a function of the film I used and not the aperture, but I don't know. I do like the textures and composition in your shot. Very well done. tim
    Thanks noseoil. Glad you like that monograph.

    Not only exposing at the smallest aperture will yield well-defined light source like a street lamp post resulting in star-burst efx, it gives more sharpness to yr image. Not to forget abt hyperfocal distance. As we know, it's pretty tough to focus in the night so exposing at smallest aperture is the safest play. Shadow details are more defined with slight over-exposed on highlights which in turn can be corrected in the wet darkroom, by burning. Or alternatively, you can expose in shorter timing with the help of flashlight flashing onto the shadow areas. If you like to have more star-burst efx, you can always fix on a Cross-Star filter lens. HOYA has 3 types i.e. Cross-Star (4 pointed flares), Star-Six (6 pointed) & Star-Eight (8 pointed).

    The main reason why I shoot my night images in B&W becuz color films cannot bring out such shadow details. Besides, the colors in the night are somehow "flushed out' and depends on the areas where there are strong light sources like tungsten street light or flood light which tends to cast a super warm yellow/orange color on the night scenery. Exposing in color under such lighting conditions is not ideal after all.

    Practically speaking, very slow films like ISO 50 or 100 should be avoided for night photography. With slower film speed, you are require to expose for super long timing and it can take more than 1 or 2 hours (in tern of using smallest aperture of f/16 or f/22). With too high film speed, heavy film grains resulted. Therefore ISO400 is the most appropriate film speed for general use.

  4. #24

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    Martin
    I must disagree on the filmspeed issue. I find ISO 50 - 100 very usefull for urban shots at night, especially ISO 100 slidefilm. there is plenty of light to make everybody happy
    A friend of mine uses Pan F at night, He don't like Efke 25 because it's to fast (Reciprocity failure issue)
    Astrophotographers like very slow film to catch startrails (the very long exposures you mention).
    Cheers Søren
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  5. #25
    Andy K's Avatar
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    I am also in the faster film camp. I use HP5+ for night shots. Wht expose a night time street scene for 15 minutes with slow film, when you can expose for between 90 seconds to 3 minutes with faster film?


    -----------My Flickr-----------
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  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    Martin
    I must disagree on the filmspeed issue. I find ISO 50 - 100 very usefull for urban shots at night, especially ISO 100 slidefilm. there is plenty of light to make everybody happy
    A friend of mine uses Pan F at night, He don't like Efke 25 because it's to fast (Reciprocity failure issue)
    Astrophotographers like very slow film to catch startrails (the very long exposures you mention).
    Cheers Søren
    FP4+ (ASA 125) is my preferred night photo film. Estimating (or sometimes completely guessing) exposure time is, to me, much easier when starting off pretty far into reciprocity failure. The longer time also allows me to correct problems during exposure rather than in the darkroom. I can burn/dodge in front of the lens, block the lens if an airplane or car goes by, and run around in the scene to light objects by hand.

    The grainy look of faster films doesn't appeal to me for most subjects. If I want faster exposure times, I'll expose at a wider aperture. Normally, I stay between f/8 and f/16.
    Jacob

  7. #27

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    Good Morning,

    I disagree that faster film is necessarily better for night shots. Basically, you're going to be using a tripod and time exposures, so it makes little difference if the exposure is fifteen seconds or three minutes. In addition, films such as T-Max 100 or Fuji Acros have such terrific reciprocity characteristics that exposure times with them may be no longer than exposure times with "fast" films. The slightly finer grain of the slower films is an additional benefit, especially in 35mm or 120. My own favorite films for night shots are T-Max 100 in B & W and Ektachrome 6121 duplicating film (E. I. 8/12???) in color.

    Konical

  8. #28
    Martin Liew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    Martin
    I must disagree on the filmspeed issue. I find ISO 50 - 100 very usefull for urban shots at night, especially ISO 100 slidefilm. there is plenty of light to make everybody happy
    A friend of mine uses Pan F at night, He don't like Efke 25 because it's to fast (Reciprocity failure issue)
    Astrophotographers like very slow film to catch startrails (the very long exposures you mention).
    Cheers Søren
    Hi Soeren, I see where you're coming from. Actually those are just my personal preference and opinion based on my experiences.

    In fact, I've yet to try Kodak Ektachrome E100VS color slide film for my next personal night photography project. Well it's nothing new as many other photographers have done it. It's Nocturne Photography. Doing light painting during that long exposure timing. Some url references here:
    http://www.thenocturnes.com/gallery.html

    I'm sure at ISO100, one can get good star trails but it's best to expose during clear dark sky & many stars. Yes you'll need to bring along a radio or a book during exposing. Best to bring along a friend to chat over coffee.

  9. #29
    Martin Liew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erickson
    FP4+ (ASA 125) is my preferred night photo film. Estimating (or sometimes completely guessing) exposure time is, to me, much easier when starting off pretty far into reciprocity failure. The longer time also allows me to correct problems during exposure rather than in the darkroom. I can burn/dodge in front of the lens, block the lens if an airplane or car goes by, and run around in the scene to light objects by hand.

    The grainy look of faster films doesn't appeal to me for most subjects. If I want faster exposure times, I'll expose at a wider aperture. Normally, I stay between f/8 and f/16.
    Hi Erickson,

    I've also heard of the method u mentioned. Doing burning/dodging during the long exposure timing by placing yr finger(s) or thumb right in front of the lens to block away any direct light source e.g. blocking a streetlight with a pair of disposable chopsticks. Only expose the light source on the last few seconds. The end result will show more shadow details with even highlight balance on the direct light source.

    I agree with you on the point that we should correct problems during exposure rather than in the darkroom. That way we'll have a good negative to do straight printing with minor editing.

    Well if it doesn't succeed, we can always go back to the place and do it again.

  10. #30

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    Thanks, I didn't imagine that I will get so much rich replys.

    mhv: I still don get what is reciprocity failure?

    Martin Liew: It is nice shot. I like the ray effect. But why there is not pure black regions? Is it because of fast film?

    soeren: I take notes from the table, but this table is only for ambients with pretty much light. I did some night street photos with it and it works good, but it is not what I want to do.

    noseoil: I think that copying of intellectual property makes more damage to the publishers than to authors themselves.

    erickson: Blocking lens is real smart idea, must try it. But how you exactly dodge?

    I did some experiment shoots and found that for my case i need to expose about one hour.
    I did relative good light and dark balance with 2.8F, 50sec and ISO100 color.
    But, here I heard that I should use smaller aperture, and so I found that with 11F I should expose about one hour.
    Im afraid that I will not have time for this for much reasons.

    So, what is difference between small and big aperture? What is the biggest aperture that I can use? And how I calculate faster film in? (If I expose 50sec with ISO100 i need to expose 25sec with ISO200?)

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