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  1. #1

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    Moose versus plain Polarizer Filter?

    Is there any reason not to get the Moose? The prices are pretty close and in some cases the Moose is cheaper. The 81a won't make that much of a difference will it? With negative film will I even notice it?

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I guess the question is whether you always like to use a warming filter with a polarizer. I think the effect of an 81a filter is usually noticable with color slide film, but I don't shoot a lot of color neg. If you have two separate filters, you can choose, but if you always find yourself using them together (i.e., if you like the "Outdoor Photography" look), then it makes sense to use the combo filter.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3

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    I only use my Moose polarizors. I have no idea where my regular nonwarming one is. I find the difference to be very noticable in neg and tranny
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  4. #4

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    I'm a little suprised it's so noticable with negative film. :o I ordered one from some guy on Ebay now. If it's too strong I can get a smaller plain one later but I'd like two avoid buying to bigger polarizers.

  5. #5

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    I see the difference because I deal with some serious shadows out here in the morning and evening. I did comparison shots when I got the moose and saw the difference. yes the biggest difference is with Transparency film.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    If you're shooting at altitude in general, you might want a warming filter all the time in any case, so there are good reasons for it. Shade and overcast conditions call for a warming filter as well.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #7
    KenM's Avatar
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    I only know one kind of moose, and it ain't something you put on a camera

    Is a 'Moose' a brand of a type of filter?? Help me out here....
    Cheers!

    -klm.

  8. #8

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    3 kinds of Moose !

    We have three kinds of moose here in New Brunswick. The antlered kind,the bottled kind (best ale in Canada) and a filter by Moose Paterson. Here's the web site Ken: www.moose395.net

    Mike

  9. #9
    KenM's Avatar
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    Sorry, I'll stick with the rock in a bottle - Big Rock, that is

    Thanks for the link - it's all good now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kennedy
    We have three kinds of moose here in New Brunswick. The antlered kind,the bottled kind (best ale in Canada) and a filter by Moose Paterson. Here's the web site Ken: www.moose395.net

    Mike
    Cheers!

    -klm.

  10. #10
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    Though I have never used a Moose warm polarizer, I have used a Tiffen Warm Polarizer, and at present I use Singh Ray Warm Polarizing filters.

    I shoot fairly exclusively on transparency material, particularly Velvia and Provia 100. From my experience regular polarizing filters though they will add color back to a scene, they tend to be a bit cool and to have a bit of a blue cast which is particularly noticed in the shadow areas. The beauty of these filters is that they add the color back and they warm up the scene a little as well.

    I have basically retired my regular polarizing filters for color transparency shooting- that includes my B&W and Heliopan polarizing filters.

    I have also retired my Tiffen Warm Polarizer for most applications. I use the Singh Ray warm polarizing filters. They tend to allow more light through the filter, have less light loss, and tend to be sharper than even my B&W and Heliopan polarizing filters.

    Singh Ray has a new Lighter Brighter Warm Polarizing filter that allows even more light through the filter with less light loss. I am saving up for this in the Cokin P Holder size so that I can use the filter with most of my lenses. I could use this filter with lenses with filter thread sizes of 40.5mm to 82mm. This will allow me to use the filter on all but 2 of my Leica R series lenses as well as all my 4" x 5" lenses (will also work on my Mamiya 7II lenses, but I had Singh Ray replace the glass in the special Mamiya polarizing filter for the camera).

    By the way the Singh Ray Polarizing filters are glass and not resin. They are however expensive.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

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