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  1. #1

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    Sunny 16 onwards

    I'm looking for exposure data tables - things like the Sunny 16 rule but with more information.

    Many years ago, exposure data table were constantly published in all the journals. Now all we get is the brief snippets that film manufacturers put with their rolls of film. Has anybody any ideas where I could find detailed tables of exposure data?

  2. #2

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    Since most use light meters to determine exposure, it is probably not information that is published.

    Fred Picker (founder of Zone VI) used a system called the Key Day system. A variation of the Sunny F 16 rule. His system went like this. If there were no clouds...bright sunlight then F16 or equivalent EV was the exposure for the day. For a light overcast day open a stop. For heavy overcast open another stop. For open shade open another stop. For deep shade open another stop.

    His system was based on the fact that Edward Weston, so far as I know, never used a light meter and made some incredible images. It is entirely possible to learn to read light without the benefit of a meter. In fact I think that many would benefit from learning the practice for those times that a meter is unavailable (Ansel Adams' Moonrise over Hernendez) or when the batteries shoot craps.

    Good luck I hope that this helps.

  3. #3
    reellis67's Avatar
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    There is this site

    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm

    Which may be what you are looking for. It's not a reproduction of old exposure tables, but it does address gauging light without a meter.

    - Randy

  4. #4

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    I have found it helpful to check your meter reading against sunny 16 and ask yourself why there is a difference.
    art is about managing compromise

  5. #5
    gnashings's Avatar
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    Even without holding on to the chart, I found Fred Parker's page very helpful. I learned a lot that I didn't know, and re-examined a lot of what I did know with a better understanding. Good read!

  6. #6

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    I have downloaded and printed his webpage (had to convert to word first though as it was going off the edge) and even then to print in landscape!

    It looks very interesting indeed.

    I'm toying with the idea of putting together a photographers' pocket book with all these tables etc in them. It'll be primarily for my own use but if others are interested - well, I'll see about that when and if it all comes together.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    Since most use light meters to determine exposure, it is probably not information that is published.

    Fred Picker (founder of Zone VI) used a system called the Key Day system. A variation of the Sunny F 16 rule. His system went like this. If there were no clouds...bright sunlight then F16 or equivalent EV was the exposure for the day. For a light overcast day open a stop. For heavy overcast open another stop. For open shade open another stop. For deep shade open another stop.

    His system was based on the fact that Edward Weston, so far as I know, never used a light meter and made some incredible images. It is entirely possible to learn to read light without the benefit of a meter. In fact I think that many would benefit from learning the practice for those times that a meter is unavailable (Ansel Adams' Moonrise over Hernendez) or when the batteries shoot craps.

    Good luck I hope that this helps.
    Thanks. Everybody's been so helpful. I'm mostly a digital photographer these days although I absolutely refuse to sell my 35mm Nikon outfit!

  8. #8
    Stephen Benskin's Avatar
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    Photographic Exposure Guide - ANSI PH2.7-1986

    This guide is derived from the seminal paper by Loyd Jones in the late 40s.

  9. #9

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    Has everyone forgotten about the Kodak pocket photoguide? There was also the little Master photoguide and the bigger Professional photoguide. All three had an existing light exposure dial that covered everything from skyline at sunset to fireworks to Niagara falls under dark lights. The pro guide even has moonlighted landscapes. I don't leave home without one.

    Do these digital imaging stores have these anymore? I know you can fine one at the photo shows.

    Rhys you may be stepping on some Kodak copyrighted toes here. Watch out.

    If you need an answer to a specific problem, give me a PM. I'll give you the Kodak answer. They were real good once.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by photobum
    Has everyone forgotten about the Kodak pocket photoguide? There was also the little Master photoguide and the bigger Professional photoguide. All three had an existing light exposure dial that covered everything from skyline at sunset to fireworks to Niagara falls under dark lights. The pro guide even has moonlighted landscapes. I don't leave home without one.

    Do these digital imaging stores have these anymore? I know you can fine one at the photo shows.

    Rhys you may be stepping on some Kodak copyrighted toes here. Watch out.

    If you need an answer to a specific problem, give me a PM. I'll give you the Kodak answer. They were real good once.
    Nope. Not going to infringe anybody's copyright but... I'll see if I can find that book.

    There are formulae around to calculate Lunar and Solar positions at various times in the year. I must find out about that next :d

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