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  1. #31

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    Whew! And all this time I thought I understood the Zone System! Ha! Now I find there are several more layers.

    Makes me dizzy just to think of it!

  2. #32
    Stephen Benskin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob01721
    Whew! And all this time I thought I understood the Zone System! Ha! Now I find there are several more layers.

    Makes me dizzy just to think of it!
    The ZS is for one a good tool for visualization, two a simplification of tone reproduction theory, and three flawed.

  3. #33

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    Steve,
    I concur...
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  4. #34
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    If the original poster of this thread is trying to apply the zone system to the "format" I believe he is really interested in, well, your talking about maybe three stops of real latitude and an abrupt shoulder and toe, so a pretty tough row to hoe. It is designed with much more in mind than that "format" can deliver.
    That's just, like, my opinion, man...

  5. #35
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Rhys,

    Are you using colour or B&W film? Do you develop your own film or send it to a lab?

    The Zone System is only one approach towards getting the exposure you want. There are other ways of getting there, each with their own purpose.

    There isn't really any such thing as a universally correct exposure, but there is the correct exposure for what the individual photographer wants.

    One fairly standard exercise when you are starting in photography (and when you are learning a new film or even a digital camera) is to do a series of different exposures of the same scene, noting how the exposure relates to the meter reading, and what you are metering off. Then try to make the best print from each of those frames. See how the tonal relationships change, see which print you prefer, see which part of the tonal range is most important to you.

    You may wish to peg your exposure to the midtones, you may wish to peg it to the highlights. You don't have to peg it to the shadows. I'd forget about trying to apply the Zone System to begin with, though there is no harm in reading and, more importantly, understanding texts about it.

    Best,
    Helen

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Benskin
    The ZS is for one a good tool for visualization, two a simplification of tone reproduction theory, and three flawed.
    Well said. I use it mainly to visualize a printed image. As long as I know my shadows will show detail and my highlights aren't blown out too badly, I'm happy. Beyond that, I don't get too technical.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    Rhys,

    Are you using colour or B&W film? Do you develop your own film or send it to a lab?

    The Zone System is only one approach towards getting the exposure you want. There are other ways of getting there, each with their own purpose.

    There isn't really any such thing as a universally correct exposure, but there is the correct exposure for what the individual photographer wants.

    One fairly standard exercise when you are starting in photography (and when you are learning a new film or even a digital camera) is to do a series of different exposures of the same scene, noting how the exposure relates to the meter reading, and what you are metering off. Then try to make the best print from each of those frames. See how the tonal relationships change, see which print you prefer, see which part of the tonal range is most important to you.

    You may wish to peg your exposure to the midtones, you may wish to peg it to the highlights. You don't have to peg it to the shadows. I'd forget about trying to apply the Zone System to begin with, though there is no harm in reading and, more importantly, understanding texts about it.

    Best,
    Helen

    Actually, I do all of the above. I develop and print my own B/W films, shoot slide film, shoot colour negative (I do develop my own slide film and used to develop my own colour negative and do the colour printing too but these days I tend not to since labs are so cheap). I also shoot digital. Actually, the only processes I don't do are E4 and C21.

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