Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,982   Posts: 1,523,834   Online: 1122
      
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    get_me_a_gun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Lowell, MA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    93
    Images
    10

    How do I get the Abercrombie look?

    Hi,

    I am shooting a model in a few weeks and I want to do some tests to see if I can get the abercrombie look. By looking at the photos I can tell they are overexposed.. but by how much ? Would I change my development time? Any other suggestions? (Time of day, kind of weather, etc)

    He is a white male, skin is pale to slight tan, Ill be shooting him in light jeans, from the waist up. He has a few tattoos.

    Thanks in advance!
    Lisa

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,168
    Images
    20
    You mean like the ones in this gallery?--

    http://www.abercrombie.com/anf/lifes.../homepage.html

    They don't look particularly overexposed to me. They're shot in daylight. Some look like they have a reflector fill and the softer shots look like they probably have the sun diffused with a scrim overhead and maybe to the side.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    861
    The look is largely the work of Bruce Weber. You could probably ask him about it, and might even get an e-mail reply about his working choices.

    http://www.bruceweber.com

    He is a somewhat controversial individual. While his look is often emulated, it is not without detractors. You might want to read up a bit about him, such as this article to start:

    http://www.glbtq.com/arts/weber_b.html

    I think it is less his usage of B/W films, as it is the nature or
    style he uses in his images. It can be a good exercise, or learning experience, to emulate the look that other photographers created. However, instead of becoming the next Bruce Weber, I would encourage you to develop you own unique style.

    If it is more the soft B/W or vintage look, you can get some way towards that using a few different films. Shoot TriX (ISO 400) at ISO 200 and pull process to get a softer look is one thing to try. My own people film preference has been AGFA APX100, recently reborn as Rollei Retro 100. Basically, experiment to find choices that will best express your creative vision.

    Ciao!

    Gordon

  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,097
    Images
    60
    [QUOTE=get_me_a_gun]Hi,
    I am shooting a model in a few weeks and I want to do some tests to see if I can get the abercrombie look./QUOTE]

    Sarcasm warning here. I think I may have been looking at too many ads in Vanity Fair.

    Put your model in a BMW

    The lighting is nice, but un-remarkable. Scrims are likely, and/or large reflectors. Daylight for sure. High white cloud too maybe.

    I thinkk the prints are good though.

    Matt

  5. #5
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    concur with mr goldfarb: tmy and xtol gives a ton of shadow detail with soft highlights

    or xtol with fp4, hp5, tri x ....

    a tiny flash fill if the shadows are heavy

    open shade, open sky... maybe a bug scrim ( think cine lighting )

    think shooting early or late in the day, when the sun is behind a tree or building

    ( what we've called 'sweet light' as long as there have been shooters )

    or, in the city

    keep the sun out of the shot if you can, or you'll need scrims and reflectors

    pretty simple, basic stuff

    a big park where you've got room to move folks around while the light is low

    around lowell, lot's of choices

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  6. #6
    gr82bart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Culver City, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,224
    Images
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by get_me_a_gun
    I am shooting a model in a few weeks and I want to do some tests to see if I can get the abercrombie look. By looking at the photos I can tell they are overexposed.. but by how much ?
    Scan a pic so that we can get an idea of what you're talking about. There have been several &F campaigns so it's hard to know which ad campaign you are referring to.

    Would I change my development time?
    No matter what you do, you are trying to get it correct on film so that there is no need to adjust negative development, unless you're purposely pushing/pulling or made a mistake.

    Any other suggestions? (Time of day, kind of weather, etc)
    Personally I love shooting in the 'golden hours' - these are the 1 hour before and after sunrise and sunset respectively.

    He is a white male, skin is pale to slight tan, Ill be shooting him in light jeans, from the waist up. He has a few tattoos.
    A decent make up artists/hair stylist is always good. They assist and also provide some styling advice. Men need some make up as well when doing a fashion shoot - just to bring out the eyes for example and touch up any blemishes.

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  7. #7
    gr82bart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Culver City, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,224
    Images
    37
    Oops, I forgot make sure you meter everything.

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    413
    120 tri-x, rate it around 200. Don't over process it. Tactful fill when shooting. Though, Weber's light can actually be pretty hard too, but in print (or post) the contrast is kept down. Maybe pick scenes where the model blends in tonally (i.e. don't shoot him rolling around in dark mud; rather shoot him rolling around in tanned grass...regardless, there should be lots of rolling around).

    Shooting handheld will help too. Pentax 67 is Weber's thing. But anything you can dance with will work.

    That's just a starting point I'd guess at. I really don't know or have any special insights.

    Weber seems to take a lot of flack from other photographers, b/c it seems like what he does is so simple. Honestly, I'm not a big fan of his work, but I that's not to say I don't think what he does is a) not diffucult and b) that he's not very good at it.

    Have fun with it! And don't be afraid to make mistakes and learn on small shoots.

  9. #9
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Athens
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    985
    Images
    98
    The closest I ever got to that look was with 4x5 AP100 (that was before APX !!!) shot on cloudy days at E.I. 50 and developed with dilute (1+3) ID-11, then printed on Record-Rapid. When APX came out (I think it was around 1988-89) I thought it didn't have the "velvety" look I found in AP.
    Since the only thing you can still find is ID-11, it's rather difficult to do the same... But I think that 4x5 FP-4 shot @ E.I. 50 and developed in Perceptol 1+3 can do the job...



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin