Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,907   Posts: 1,555,874   Online: 981
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37
  1. #1
    johnny9fingers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NW Wisconsin hard by the shore of Lake Superior
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    108
    Images
    5

    How do you determine exposure without a meter?

    Hello, Is there a guide or method to determine exposure without a meter that gives consistent results? I will be getting a Fuji G690 soon and want to take the best advantage of the nice big negative. I've used digital cameras (all gone now) and cameras with meters, ie the Yashica GN, and the Oly XA. The G690 is meterless. I'm still an amateurish photographer with a lot to learn, and am wondering if it's best to go with a meter for a while then try shooting without to match the results I got while using a meter, or just go without from the start?? I will be shooting a wide variety of situations, candids, landscape, portraits..... but will stick with HP 5+, and will devope and print in my brand new darkroom. Is that a factor as well, it's been 30+ years since I've worked in a darkroom? Thank you for your time and consideration, 9fingers

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    Rules of thumb exist but a meter sure helps indoors.

    Search for Sunny F/16 rule. That covers most outdoor situations. But it takes awhile to really learn. I think it's also easier if you've got a meter or a camera with a meter while you're learning. Basically judge the light then compare with the meter. Then figure out why it's different.

  3. #3
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,618
    Images
    1
    In Wisconsin, the sunny-16 rule should work for most of the year, between 10am and 4pm. It goes like this:
    On a bright day, take your ASA speed and turn it into the shutter speed, then shoot at that speed at f/16. So, a 400 ASA film would be used at 1/400s at f/16. Always round the number to the next slower speed, since overexposure with B&W film is not an issue but underexposure is a big problem. You can modify the rule to the cloudy-f/8 rule or the gloomy-f/4 rule to make it work. The sun is a very constant light source.

    Kodak film boxes also come with some exposure instruction inside. On the web you might find old exposure instructions for a variety i-of lighting conditions. Beyond that and to get better and consistent exposure, get a good light meter.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #4
    DBP
    DBP is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,885
    Images
    34
    There is an extremely comprehensive guide to not using a meter on Fred Parker's website www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm. For outdoor work I use a meter maybe half the time. Some of my better shots have been taken using the Sunny 16 rule, which you can easily condense onto a small piece of paper to carry around, or as many amateurs used to do, tape inside the camera case. Black and white print film is pretty forgiving.

    Here's the cheat sheet I sometimes carry.


    Aperture Lighting Conditions Shadow Detail
    f/22 Sand or snow Distinct
    f/16 Sunny Distinct
    f/11 Slight Overcast Soft around edges
    f/8 Overcast Barely visible
    f/5.6 Heavy Overcast /Open shade No shadows
    f/4 Deep shade
    Set shutter speed close to film ISO, e.g. 400=1/500

    From here you can of course trade off speed for aperture. There are also both old and modern slide rules you can find for calculating exposure.

    Indoors, carry a meter. They can be pretty cheap.

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,344
    Images
    20
    Here are a couple more--

    Indoors--average room light at ISO 400 is about f:2 at 1/30 sec. This is surprisingly consistent, but I guess humans like a certain amount of light. Turning on an extra lamp or two in a room with overhead lighting usually doesn't make a huge difference--less than half a stop. For really low lighting, say in a bar or dim restaurant, you usually need another two stops or so--f:1.4 at 1/15 sec.

    A floodlit building at night at ISO 400 is about f:2 at 1 sec. This also seems remarkably consistent.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,212
    Images
    47
    When ( not if ) you move up to a view camera. Use the camera ground glass as a meter when outside, but it doesn't work to good in low light.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,958
    I would use a good meter. I used a Minolta SRT-101 with a dead meter for years and I got good results using a source of the sunny 16 rule plus a lot of guessing. The reason I didn't have money for a meter or a camera with a working meter. I don't have problem using a camera without a meter. But if I have a good meter I would use it. If I were you I would simply buy a good meter, or may be two.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,520
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    8
    for night work -
    sodium ( or is it mercury ) vapor lamps ( 3 to a pole 30 feet up?)
    asa 100 film f22 45 seconds

  9. #9
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,676
    Images
    14
    Johnny 9 fingers

    You will love the 6x9 fuji camera , I am looking for a replacement myself, busted mine.
    This is an excellent thread and some wonderful advice.
    The simplicity of this sunny16 way of exposing is my preferred metering, it allows one to concentrate soley on image creation and I think a lot more photographers should give it a try and work less on technique and more on composition and the details within the framework of the ground glass.
    I exposed over 200 rolls of tri using the fuji and this metering method on a metal project that is still ongoing and have yet to see a bad negative.
    have fun

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    839
    Images
    42
    My father used to have a little dial calculator that allowed you to dial in the film speed, type of subject (open, shade, etc.), type of light (direct sun, overcast etc.), and a time of day and geographical latitude. In principle it was as good as an incident meter. It didn't help with subject contrast - you had to do that bit in your head.

    Useful little tool.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin