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  1. #1
    bherg's Avatar
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    learning light metering

    Hello world,


    Do any of you have a good tip on a book for exposure metering? to learn it really good from the begining.

    I have tried to read the negative by ansel adams, but i feel the book is a bit to heavy for me.

    Are there a book that explains his book? :P


    Cheers Johannes

  2. #2
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    2 that I found useful when I crossed that bridge are Using the View Camera by Steve Simmons and a little book by Fred Picker that I think was called Zone VI Workshop with Fred Picker or something like that. Also Fred Picker had a book of example photos where he talks about how he decided to place the values in each one. Stuff like that can be really useful.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  3. #3
    Helen B's Avatar
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    There's a book called "Perfect Exposure" by Roger Hicks and Frances Schultz which covers the subject quite well. Roger is, of course, a member of APUG but he's far too shy and modest to promote one of his own books.

    Best,
    Helen

  4. #4
    bherg's Avatar
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    how do i purchase theese books?


    cheers Johannes

  5. #5
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Try Amazon.com

    Maybe Roger can sell his books from home?

  6. #6
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
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    I just ordered the Zone VI book for $0.86 and was excited to see it arrive today. Then I opened the package and the wrong order got shipped. Drat.
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
    Website - FB

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce (Camclicker)
    Try Amazon.com

    Maybe Roger can sell his books from home?
    Alas, no. Postage and packing (to say nothing of storage and the fact that if I am away, the order could sit for weeks) make this infeasible.

    And Helen: thanks for the plug. 'Quite well' from you is praise equivalent to 'superbly' from some other people.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com -- where there is a little more about the book, plus, in the Photo School, some modules on exposure)

  8. #8
    Sparky's Avatar
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    If the guy is finding Adams' book a bit heavy - then I don't think Picker's the ticket, exactly. I'll tell you what - I'll give you my 2 cents on light metering (all you need to know in my opinion) - and it should be more than enough to get you going and making confident exposures. Others can choose to disagree with me if they wish. I don't mean to usurp any book sales here - but honestly - I think this is at least, in part what this community should be about. Sharing.

    Here goes.

    I'll give you the lowdown on the two basic types of light metering, that are, in my opinion, the most useful. Incident, and Reflected.

    Incident metering is generally the better way to go (IMO) if you don't want to clutter your head with numbers and other issues. What you are in fact measuring is the level of Illumination of a given scene. It won't work so well for very distant scenes (since it requires taking a measurement AT the subject), and assumes that the level of illumination is relatively constant. Stand where your subject is - and point the meter (make sure it's in incident mode - usually requiring fitting an incident dome attachment over the ligtht sensitive cell) DIRECTLY at the camera. The critical thing for this type of metering is making sure that the 'direction' of the meter is roughly parallel with the axis of the lens. This will give you a general measurement for the illumination of the 'scene' and will automatically compensate for shadow, highlight and dark/light colored surfaces. Something that reflected metering will not. In situations of mixed lighting, where you have objects of interest in deep shadow and also brilliantly lit areas - it's not such a bad idea to do TWO readings - one in the bright area, and one in the shadows - and take an average between the two.

    Reflected metering gives you the average of light reflected FROM the scene, and since the meter is not equipped with a MIND - that means it doesn't know the difference between a bright object in low illumination or a dark object in brighter illumination. Many people use something called a 'grey card' - which is a calibrated neutral grey tone (18% reflectance usually) that will give you an average value of reflectance of the light falling on that scene. This is physically done by pointing your meter (again - keeping the axis parallel with the lens axis - but this time AWAY from the camera and toward the subject - try to keep the cell out of any glaring light if possible - shade it where you have to - it may otherwise give you a false reading).

    Where it starts getting COMPLICATED is when you take specific measurements of an area of the scene of an object of a certain tone/color under specific lighting. This is the basis for measurement with Adams' zone system and it's spinoffs. It sounds to me like you're just getting things rolling - I wouldn't worry about this until you were actually INTERESTED in it. In my opnion (many will disagree with me!) there's no practical reason in working this way - I would MUCH prefer concentrating on good subject matter, getting good light and trying not to spoil my film.

    EXPOSE FOR THE SHADOWS AND DEVELOP FOR THE HIGHLIGHTS!

    This is a classic credo in photography - and is actually somewhat profound, as all systems of exposure aim to do this very thing. Think about this expression. It will pay off.

  9. #9
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    ... 'Quite well' from you is praise equivalent to 'superbly' from some other people.
    ...
    Exactly. Maybe I should do a simultaneous translation of Helenspeak into American, for example, to better assist international comprehension.

    Best,
    Helen

  10. #10
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    'Quite well' from you is praise equivalent to 'superbly' from some other people.

    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    Exactly. Maybe I should do a simultaneous translation of Helenspeak into American, for example, to better assist international comprehension.

    This is like the scene at the end of the second Bill and Ted movie where the televised concert is being watched by people all over the world who are all reacting enthusiastically.... Except for the British family who are applauding politely and saying ".. quite good.... quite good"


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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