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  1. #11
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    I'm no expert in metering. You've obviously been every comfortable with the meter in the Nikon for quite awhile and find it easy to use. New gear may make your work better, it may not, depending on what you're really trying to do in LF. According to the testimony from the much more experienced and skilled folks who have contributed to this thread already, it can certainly make your metering in any given shot more precise. Do you feel you need more precision?

    Some simple questions you may want to think about:
    1. If you do buy a new meter, will you continue to want the Nikon with you anyway?
    2. Do you find yourself shooting the scene with the Nikon when you begin to meter? I always shoot a few frames in 35 as a sort of reference. I don't hike very far with the 4x5 and having a 35 handy isn't a problem for me.
    3. Will the familiar tool, the Nikon, actually distract you from the very different experience of working with the 4x5? I sometimes find it difficult to shift mental modes when changing formats and gear in the field.

  2. #12
    gr82bart's Avatar
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    If anything, it's an incident meter I would prefer over a spot meter or the in-camera meter.

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  3. #13
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    With a sufficiently long lens, a camera's built-in spot metering could easily be less than 1 degree so I don't see a problem there (about 250mm of my 300mm zoom on my EOS gives about 1 degree) but, trouble is, a long lens weighs a fair bit; add the weight of the camera and you are talking... what? 4 or more times the weight of a spot meter? A kilo or more? Worth considering if you are walking any distance. It also takes up a lot more room.

    If you are taking the 35mm anyway then it's likely to be a better fit and you can put the money saved towards a new LF lens, but otherwise I think it's worth splashing out on a spotmeter.

    Cheers, Bob.
    Last edited by Bob F.; 09-10-2006 at 06:03 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Misspelt "EOS" (I mean, there's only three letters! Tsk!)

  4. #14

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    my meter is both a spot and incident meter. It is great to enter the settings, put the device around your neck and you can switch from the M645 to the RZ to the 4x5 anytime..or back and forth...all the while using the same meter. You never have to buy a metered finder if you're using MF. ...just my 2 cents.

  5. #15
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    I use my Bessa R with a 90mm lens as my backup meter. Bang on accurate. Light too. Lugging a N90s around just seems like overkill to me. I have one, but would prefer to take the Bessa.
    www.ericrose.com
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anupam Basu View Post
    I was planning to carry my N90s with...
    You've reminded me to work with my Olympus OM2000 as
    a spot meter and as importantly as a grab shot camera.
    Should equip it with a 35-105 Oly zoom.

    Most of my shooting is woods scenics and streams.
    A few years ago I was headed up a trail with my OM1n
    ready to shoot. I spotted an owl perched in a small tree
    very near the trail. I began a series of photos as I
    very quietly approached nearer. My last near shot
    was no more than two arms length. The owl
    took flite and landed on distant limbs
    where it was the subject of two
    more shots.

    Turned out it was a Spotted Owl; the rarely seen
    endangered species found here in the North West.

    Be sure you've film in the camera. Dan

  7. #17
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I think the biggest reason NOT to use the Nikon as a meter for your LF camera is that it makes you stop looking at the scene from the perspective of your LF camera. Not only are you now analyzing the scene through the 2:3 proportion viewfinder of the 35mm, but you are looking at it from a different point of view than your camera on the tripod. I find that I have a hard time retaining vision of what objects in a scene I want to analyze when looking through a different viewfinder, especially since most 35mm cameras don't have the metering spot marked in the finder, so you're not entirely certain what it is metering from.

  8. #18
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    A 35mm SLR may have a meter but it is not a meter. Use the right tool for the job. A good spot meter will out do an in-camera meter. Why go to all the trouble to work in LF if you are going to do some sort of hybred metering with an SLR?
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  9. #19
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportera View Post
    Try the Slr metering for awhile, then buy a meter if you need one.

    Anupam, This is good advice. The meter in your N90 will be plenty good. I carry a 35mm slr (Nikon FA) in my kit and use the meter all the time - works fine.

  10. #20
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the posts. I decided to go with the N90s, at least for a while as I will be carrying it anyway. 4x5 can't do many of the kinds of shooting I want to do, but while using the LF camera, I won't be composing thru the N90s - I only take it out to meter particular spots, as the final step before setting the exposure.

    Meanwhile, here's my first LF print.

    Thanks,
    -Anupam
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails first.jpg  

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