Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,939   Posts: 1,557,395   Online: 968
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Norwich, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,405
    Images
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Brewer View Post
    OMT...........as I look at the image again, whatever the angle/distance from the illumination, it's perfect as it tails off and forms shadows along the ridges of her cheeks, along with the way the shadow forms on the neck, and selective focus, there's a tremendous sense of depth...................a heavyweight shot this.
    John

    I am drawn back to this image time and time again. I think it is wonderful and would love to have the technical ability to recreate the feeling. I am going to try and enlarge it and print it as a kallitype just for the fun of it.

    Thanks for the comments

    Phill
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  2. #22
    jimgalli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tonopah Nevada
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,404
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    155
    Quote Originally Posted by philldresser View Post
    John

    I am drawn back to this image time and time again. I think it is wonderful and would love to have the technical ability to recreate the feeling. I am going to try and enlarge it and print it as a kallitype just for the fun of it.

    Thanks for the comments

    Phill
    Make a good scan, desaturate all the color out, re-size it where you want it, invert it to neg, rotate 180 degrees horiz. and digitally print it on decent (not blotchy) paper. Then contact with your paper neg. Have fun.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    109
    Hey Phil, Hey Jim Galli...........................I marvel at the ability of some of these portrait photographers of 50-100 years ago, and because of the passage of time, most will never be known.

    That is a helluva smile.
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Norwich, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,405
    Images
    90
    I spoke to my Uncle today. He reckons that the image is more like 1925. He remembers his mother telling him that her father had won a studio sitting as a prize at a local fete. It was possibly this one.

    Phill
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  5. #25
    John Bartley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    13 Critchley Avenue, PO Box 36, Monteith Ont, P0K1P0
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,397
    When I see the scans posted in the galleries here of the prints made from wet plates, I see a huge difference between them and the prints made from "conventional" negatives. The wet plate photos have a depth (best way I can describe it) to them that I can't see in prints made from conventional negatives.
    I see that same "depth" in this postcard and I wonder if it might have been some sort of glass plate negative?

    cheers

  6. #26
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,867
    Blog Entries
    1
    What a beautifully done portrait obviously from teh 1920's as evidenced by the dress.

    NO doubt a studio portrait. Most likely lit by skylight with controls for brightness and possibly a reflector to soften the contrast. It appears much like those made with a 12" Wollensak II, stopped down no more than one stop.

    In my very early youth one of the highlights of my life was to visit A.J.Thuss, a portrait photographer who worked in this manner. He would set up the big 16x20 or 11x14 studio camera utilizing one or the other of his dividing backs so he could get 4, or more images on one sheet of film. Now that was confidence in exposure knowledge. Development was not a problem because he did his own by inspection.

    As for the printing process, I find it hard to specify because the color may not be true on the screen, it could have shifted over the years, and other factors. I suspect it was printed on a warm tone paper and toned, but like everyone else, I am just guessing.

    This image is a real prize!! Thank you for sharing it with us.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  7. #27
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,359
    Images
    20
    Definitely some handwork on the negative with pencil there. It was standard to smooth out any lines on the face and neck, retouch any blemishes, and bring up the values on the cheekbones a bit, enhancing the lighting from the skylight that is visible in the catchlights in her eyes. It was also common to lighten the irises, but I don't think that was done here.

    Albumen was common for cabinet cards from the 1870s-90s, but would be fairly unusual for the 1920s, and is usually identifiable as a print on thin paper mounted to heavier cardstock, which isn't this.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #28
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,831
    Quote Originally Posted by athanasius80 View Post
    The lower portion of the image was probably also vignetted out.
    The vignetting could be done easily and well in-camera with a suitable attachment. We now think of vignetting as being done all around the subject. With good a commercial or home-built vignetting system, the vignetting could be applied in any area to any degree. The lightness of the bottom could be due to a little too much light on the vignetter. It is a fine portrait of a striking subject.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin