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  1. #11
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Put the camera inside your coat when you go out.

    Open the back just a little.

    Close it again.

    All the fog you could want!

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyno View Post
    Does this mean that it's just film base plus fog?
    Mike :rolleyes:
    It took me a minute.

  3. #13

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    I find the grain doesn't work well with fog. As such, I tend to print small, use fine-grained film, use a fine grain developer, and/or use a larger piece of film. This is especially true since I usually give fog exposures N+2 (or more) development. With fog, there's very little contrast, and so I expose at zone IV and develop the bejesus out the film. That's simply what works for me.

  4. #14
    Troy Hamon's Avatar
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    Shooting toward light sources accentuates fog or mist.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter De Smidt View Post
    ...This is especially true since I usually give fog exposures N+2 (or more) development. With fog, there's very little contrast, and so I expose at zone IV and develop the bejesus out the film. ...
    Though I have really never shot fog as a subject, I would follow Peter's advice. Foggy scenes are very low in contrast and IIRC, might only have a range of tonal separation of a couple stops. So, lowered placement and extended development would seem to be the rule.

    If, for example, you placed say a dark tree trunk in fog on zone II (dark gray that has some tone but just a hint of detail), the lighter fog might only fall around zone V (middle gray). So you'd have the shadow but not the correct highlight. Overdevelopment would move the middle values upward considerably compared to the shadows which might only rise slightly in value. So with a two-stop push (N+2 development) you would probably end up with something like zone II 1/2 for the dark tree trunk (dark gray with slightly more shadow detail) while the fog would reproduce around zone VII (light gray with highlight detail). This happens because exposure has its most pronounced influence on shadows while the effects of development are seen mainly in the lighter tones. Hence the old adage "Expose for the shadows & develop for the highlights."

    What I've described here is probably akin to what White, Zakia, and Lorenz refer to as "bi-directional contrast control," in The New Zone System Manual. In this case the procedure couples an underexposure of a couple stops (N-2 exposure for the tree trunks) with overdevelopment of a couple stops (N+2 development for the fog) and visualizes the growth in contrast from the middle zones outward.

    The blue filter would probably accentuate the fogginess of the scene but I would think the contrast would be lowered considerably as well, and that is not what I would be chasing in such a scene.

    Joe

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by tuonno View Post
    now, I understand that this might sound silly but how do you do it? Last night it was VERY foggy in my town... I tried taking a few snaps with EFKE 100 film and pushed it to 400... all the shots were fine mre or less (I was photographing my friends in the city, lots of streetlight) but no fog....

    Also, during the day.... how to capture that misty feel?

    thanx!
    :-)

    The very few successful fog pics I have taken in the last 40 years -- that is, the ones I am pleased with -- are generously exposed 'chromes for a light, airy feel. In mono, light prints are almost always more successful (in my experience) than dark ones.

    Cheers,

    R.

  7. #17
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I remembered that I had put a fog shot in the galleries here, it is:

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...0&ppuser=16571

    This was taken with hp5+ under sunrise lighting. So Troy is right, light angle definitely plays a big role.

  8. #18
    juan's Avatar
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    I agree with Roger - light prints with very little nearing black seem most successful to me.
    juan

  9. #19

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    I agree that a slow (fine-grain) film is best for fog, with "generous" exposure. Again, using an incident reading helps.
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

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