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  1. #1

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    How to photograph fog?

    now, I understand that this might sound silly but how do you do it? Last night it was VERY foggy in my town... I tried taking a few snaps with EFKE 100 film and pushed it to 400... all the shots were fine mre or less (I was photographing my friends in the city, lots of streetlight) but no fog....

    Also, during the day.... how to capture that misty feel?

    thanx!
    :-)
    "Sve moze da propadne, da nestane, samo je smrt siguran poso!"

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Well, Rayleigh light scattering by water particles is what gives the fog its appearance. Its whitish because all the different colours across the spectrum are scattered. But it turns out that the amount of Rayleigh scattering goes as the inverse of the wavelength to the fourth power, so bluer wavelengths are scattered much much more than redder ones. This is the Tyndall effect that produces our blue sky.

    That's why when we use IR film, even on a hazy summer day, we can get stunningly sharp images. But at the other end of the spectrum, if you shoot a typical blue sensitive film, you will have more apparent haze.

    I haven't tried photographing fog with the intention of enhancing it, but I think I would try a blue filter and see if you can manipulate the density of the fog that way. I think blue filtering will give you more fog, red will give you less.

    Or... you could stick to a more blue sensitive film and avoid the panchromatics.

    Also try long exposures... that has a way of building up density in the fogged regions and making them stand out more from the unfogged areas. So that's a good way to go if you are trying to get fog hanging over a river or something like that.

  3. #3
    reellis67's Avatar
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    Using a blue filter *should* emphasize the fog, but I'm not familiar enough with your film to know how much you could expect with which filter. I use a minus blue (yellow #12) filter to cut asmospheric haze and to slightly darken the sky, so it would seem logical to expect a blue filter to emphasize haze (or fog) and lighten the sky.

    - Randy

  4. #4
    reellis67's Avatar
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    I just found this info, which was on the web so take it for what it's worth, but it came from a site that I've to be accurate in most all cases...

    #47
    A Blue filter (tricolor) that lightens the sky and darkens green foliage and reds. The use of a blue filter exaggerates atmospheric effects.

    - Randy

  5. #5
    DrPablo's Avatar
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    Fog also generally reduces contrast across a scene (unless you're talking about very brightly toplit or backlit fog). So you might be able to enhance this muted effect by pulling a couple stops in development.
    Paul

  6. #6

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    thank you! ;-)
    "Sve moze da propadne, da nestane, samo je smrt siguran poso!"

  7. #7
    Trask's Avatar
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    My most successful technique is that after I take the picture, and before advancing the film, I open the back of the camera and then close it again real quick. That gives the resulting photo a somewhat..foggy...look....well..

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    Fog also generally reduces contrast across a scene (unless you're talking about very brightly toplit or backlit fog). So you might be able to enhance this muted effect by pulling a couple stops in development.
    Or you could enhance it the other way if you want a little more punch. Incident reading wit NO shift factor, and overdevelop.

  9. #9

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    Does this mean that it's just film base plus fog?
    Mike :rolleyes:

  10. #10

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    Easiest is to use an incident meter for light readings. Develop with a developer that can give long tonal scale. Play with filtration too.
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

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