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  1. #11
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post
    I wondered when Nikon first introduced this kind of system
    I think it was first used on the FA then the F601, F801, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post
    Which base camp? Glad things have settled down in Nepal before her trip.
    Everest. I think it's this one: http://www.mountainmadness.com/trekking/asia_base.cfm


    Steve.

  2. #12
    Helen B's Avatar
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    The simpler, quicker and lighter the better, I suspect. I've never been on a trek in the Himalayas, but I have climbed there. On the stroll up to base camp I only carried what was necessary for being wholly autonomous during the day, along with basic emergency equipment - the sturdy porters carried the rest. I guess that organised treks are similar.

    I acclimatise to altitude slowly, tend to overexert at the beginning of a trip, and I'm usually more than a little apprehensive before a climb. This usually means that I don't want to mess around with anything other than a simple, readily available camera. It's got to be on my waistbelt. Using the camera musn't cause any delay, or break my absorption with the journey. Using it has to be part of the journey, the movement through the changing landscape, not a distraction from it.

    I use a combination of simple reflective metering when there are plenty of midtones or I'm metering against the light (very common) or the palm of my hand and open up half a stop. I never bracket, because I don't carry sufficient film (always reversal for my snaps of the hills, for talks) and hitting the right moment is often more important than hitting the exact exposure.

    My companions always seemed to produce fine photographs even though they generally trust the metering to the camera. They don't even know what 'bracket' means. It's often a lot simpler than some suggest, especially when you are going for dramatic slides.

    Oh, and glacier ice isn't white like snow, but I suspect that that isn't news.

    If you follow the first link in my signature below, and look in the 'Hills' portfolio, you'll see a few from my collection of Himalayan photos.

    Best,
    Helen
    Last edited by Helen B; 01-12-2007 at 07:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I think it was first used on the FA then the F601, F801, etc.
    Steve.
    It was the FA IIRC. Near the end of the time I paid any attention to new camera introductions. But I wasn't really wondering about that. I'll rephrase sans parenthetical remarks: "When matrix metering was first introduced, I wondered how a photographer would know what kind of adjustments to make when setting the exposure manually." Poor writing and editing on my part.

    Helen gives good advice. One thing I've done in the past is meter off an 18% gray sweater or know the reflectance of something else I'm carrying. I've seen 18% microfiber lens cleaning cloths around. If you have the gloves or parka she'll be wearing, you could test meter those. However, those now tend to be saturated bright colors for safety, and may not be entirely suitable for metering due to spectral response/mismatch among the target, light, and meter, e.g. a bright red parka in sun vs. deep blue high altitude shade.

    My son (with less experience and confidence in metering) likes to use a Lastolite EZBalance, a 12" collapsible 18% gray fabric on frame that goes down to about 5", white on the opposite side. Still it's extra stuff to carry and deal with.

    Lee
    Last edited by Lee L; 01-12-2007 at 09:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Thanks Lee and Helen.

    I think I will let her use matrix metering for just about everything except maybe add one stop for fully white scenes.

    If I give her a 50-50 mix of negative and transparency films, I think we should be o.k.

    If I can train her in manual metering in the next few months, so much the better!

    Steve.

  5. #15
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    I never use the Matrix meter but I would say it would be sufficient for general snapshooting, if not quite precise placement of tonal values etc. But the meters "intelligence" at guessing scene type is dependant on the number of pre-programmed scenes in the chip and so it might be useful to pick up an used N80 if you have AF lenses of even an F100 if you have MF. These might be at a slight advantage to the F601 at the guessing game. The N80 is very light as well and just enough camera not to limit you too much if you want to take charge, but also happy enough on auto everything. I believe they are very cheap on Ebay now. Remember that you won't have any metering with manual lenses, short of the F100 of course (which is also cheap for the camera it is.)

    -A

  6. #16
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Snow fools all meters (although I've only owned my F5 for one day so give me some time to play with it first). With my other Nikon bodies, I typically find that +1 2/3 stops is appropriate when the subject is predominantly snowy.

    When the subject is, say, a building, and dominates the scene, matrix metering handles it fine. Centre-weighted will need a nudge more exposure because the snow will still bias the result.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  7. #17
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anupam Basu View Post
    it might be useful to pick up an used N80
    Hmmm..... New camera..... Legitimate reason to buy it....!!

    Steve.

  8. #18

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    Way back in the 90's when I purchased my 1st 8008s I tried using the Matrix metering plus exposure comp. Needless to say it did not work very well, when I exposed at +1 or +1 1/2 stops the slides were washed out, I soon realized after reading the manual carefully that the program for Matrix metering would automatically compensate for scene brightness/darkness, my adding +1, 1 1/2 stops compounded the exposure change greatly. Since then I compensate only 1/3 maybe 2/3 stops for most scenes that I think need comp. I have found that Matrix works very well for 80-90% of the time. Only in extreme cases (solid light tones or solid dark tones) will I comp more than 2/3 stops. You might try testing your camera in Matrix, photograph a very light colored wall in direct even sunlight, at 0 comp, +1/3, +2/3, +1, +1.5, then find a dark colored wall in even shade and do the same but minus comp, 0, -1/3, -2/3, -1, -1.5 stops. Use shade so that there won't be any specular glints of wall. Be sure to use slide film so that you can easily see the exposure change from slide to slide. Hope this helps. RandyB.

  9. #19
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    The advice that you have been given is good and correlates well with my experience shooting photos while skiing.

    But take the long view of the situation [Pun intended]: After spending all the money of the airfare, equipment, guides, ... just take more film than your wife thinks she needs and bracket any questionable exposures.

    Film is cheap considering the rest of the cost of the trip and the likelihood that she will be able to repeat the trip.

  10. #20
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    If you take a camera out in the cold weather of Yellowstone, do you keep it in a backpack so that it won't fog but the batteries will be stressed OR do you keep it inside your clothes so the batteries are warm but the lens fogs??

    Interested photographers want to know.

    Stever

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