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  1. #41
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dslater View Post
    Knowing the aperture does have something to do with it. Since the meter knows the actual luminance and sun can only get so bright, then snow under clear skies will give a luminance value that can only be white - gray ash or black coal simply can't have as high a luminance value.
    But the aperture (alone) has nothing to do with the luminance of the scene. I can shoot at f2.8 in bright daylight if my shutter speed is fast enough, or at f22 at night if it's slow enough.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl K View Post
    ...what I'm saying is that the NIkon Matrix Metering System on my F100 consistently under-exposes in the above-mentioned situations. I am aware of the limitations of all films in their ability to reproduce very contrasty scenes. What you did not address is the Matrix Metering's tendency to under-expose in these situations. "-you can't really expect the meter to make this decision for you" is not the answer to the original question as posed by Steve Smith.
    So are you saying that in this situation your snow comes out on zone 5 or 6 instead of 7? Because I have not had that happen to me.

  3. #43
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    Yes, it underexposes the "whites."

    Quote Originally Posted by dslater View Post
    So are you saying that in this situation your snow comes out on zone 5 or 6 instead of 7? Because I have not had that happen to me.
    I just ran another test on the Nikon F100's Matrix Metering. Since there is no real snow around NJ right now, I set up large pen and ink drawings (16x20) with mostly white backgrounds and some fine black lines drawn. The camera was set up on a tripod and the lens zoomed in to include only the drawing. Slides were shot at normal 100 ISO and processed by a pro lab. All slides were about one stop under, BUT the single standard drawing, which was not a line drawing, was exposed perfectly. I've had my camera checked by Nikon and they say it's spot on. So...I always over-expose one stop in white snow scenes. Doing that insures that my snow comes out white.

  4. #44

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    I am not surprised that a poster from Puerto Rico could consistently fool the Nikon Matrix Metering, which still has a EV limit of 16 2/3. I live in Hawaii and its frequently bright enough to exceed that, think white wedding dress on the beach, clear sky. Makes your retina's ache (not the kodak ones). Generally speaking it does a good job, one way I can fool it consistently is overcast, voggy day in the lava field, or a bright day at the beach on lava rocks.

  5. #45
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    Photographing snow

    If you want the shape of the snow - drifted snow or moguls on a ski slope use the meter reading from the snow. If you want people/objects take a reading from your hand with the sun on the hand for sun light on the subject; tilt the hand so that it is shaded for backlit subjects.

    Steve

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