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  1. #1
    Zen
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    Which film speed for Kodak HIE and B+W 091 filter?

    Hello! I wonder if anyone can help?

    I'm going to Paris tomorrow for the day and I have a roll of Kodak HIE infrared film which I've never used before. Depending on the weather I might use this film with a B+W 091 dark red filter that I have. It will be for outdoor shots. Does anyone know which film speed I should set the camera to? The film packaging only mentions Kodak Wratten filters and I'm not sure which one would compare to the B+W?

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    I've shot Kodak HIE in 120 w/the wratten equivalents 25, 29, and 89b.....................I believe the B+W 091(Kodak 29), and the B+W 092(Kodak 89b), will give you the most pronouced wood effect(depending how you expose).

    Having said that, the way Kodak Hie is going to look heavily depends on your subject matter(the wood effect becomes very prominent when photographing grass/trees/shrubbery).

    Rather than give any recommendations on exposre, I'd refer you to a site that I think gives excellent insight into infrared photography using various infrared films and filters @ different exposures, and that would be the site of Jaap Los,..........go here for his site................. http://home.wxs.nl/~losjb/hometest.html ..........if the link doesn't work just google 'The infrared photography of Jaap Los'.........Good luck
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

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    Zen
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    Brilliant! Many thanks for your info and the link.

    When you've used equivalent filters which film speed have you used? I just wonder because if the B+W 091 is similar to the Kodak 29 filter, the film packaging advises ISO 50 in daylight but the website you linked to says to use ISO 200!

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    Infrared film is problematic in terms of using a meter with any kind of EI/ISO number since that might not reflect what the film is seeing in terms of its sensitivity to red.

    I refered you to the website as an overview with checking out his galleries to give you an idea of what look went with what subject matter at any particular filter-stop-shutter speed-film-development combination. I used to shoot Kodak HIE, and even now when I shoot Rollei IR I don't use a meter, from tests I got my best results outside, clear sky/very little cloud/very little haze, shooting/bracketing each shot F11-16 @1/125 w/an 89b(that would be at a 'nominal' EI rating of 50[again, everything depends upon conditions]), I shoot my Rollei IR outside under the same conditions between F6.3-8 @ 1/30 depending upon the conditions.

    I had originally moved up in terms of a filter shooting Kodak HIE from the 25(wratten equiv.) and the 29, because I wanted a more pronounced 'wood' effect, a 25R will give you a filter factor of 8 w/ b+w film, the infrared-reflected heat issues with regards to your subject matter notwithstanding. The 29 is going to be more.

    I'm trying to avoid suggesting an exposure, because what I like as a look, may not be what you want, hence my pointing you to this site, and I believe he has references to other sites, I'd prefer you perusing these images to see the look you want and what exposure created that image.

    Another suggestion, besides this site, google infrared photography with an eye to any site that has accompaning images w/exposure info, because somebody can give you a suggestion you might use to expose your film, resulting in a look you may not like.

    If you find a look you like, use the exposure info provided w/that image as a base for a bracket with one exp. over and 1 under for anything you consider important until you start getting a 'feel' for this film and what you want from it.
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

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    If you care to peruse my infrared work, I have 2 galleries on my website, the 'Metal Infrared' gallery is all Kodak HIE w/an 89B, shot as I've described, the other gallery 'Infrared' has one Maco 820 shot, the first image 'Out of Ivory', and the rest are Kodak Hie.

    Good luck.
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

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    Helen B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZenzanonBen View Post
    Brilliant! Many thanks for your info and the link.

    When you've used equivalent filters which film speed have you used? I just wonder because if the B+W 091 is similar to the Kodak 29 filter, the film packaging advises ISO 50 in daylight but the website you linked to says to use ISO 200!
    Remember that the Kodak information is for a handheld meter or a TTL meter without the filter, and Jaap Los' suggestion is for metering through a Wratten 25 or equivalent.

    As Jonathan says, there's a big mismatch between the spectral sensitivity of the film and that of a meter. Most meters should be fairly insensitive to deep red, never mind infrared, thanks to the filtration over the cell. This is mentioned in a fairly long, but moderately entertaining thread on photo.net

    Good luck,
    Helen

  7. #7
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    I shoot my infrared at 400 asa and that's with my B+W Red (090) filter on but I meter through the lens.

    If you look at my gallery I have quite a few Hie shots done with that combination. I also develop my film with D-76 straight at 11 minutes.(20 degreesC )

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    I shoot HIE @ 200 ISO with a #25 red, but on a sunny summer day, I shoot @ 400 ISO.

    ...and bracket, bracket, bracket!

  9. #9
    Zen
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    Thanks everyone for your help and great links. I'm so sorry it's taken me ages to reply, I've just been so busy lately.

    In the end I only took a few shots that day in Paris as it was fairly cloudy and overcast. Still need to finish the film on a brighter, sunny day somewhere. I set the camera to 200 ISO and metered TTL with the filter attached, and bracketed one stop either side. Look forward to eventually seeing the processed negs.

    Most of my pics that day were taken with my Lomo Fisheye camera, funny how things work out! One of the shots is on my website homepage.



 

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