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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B View Post
    A Sekonic L-508 with a Minolta Booster II attached is two stops more sensitive than that.
    Helen - I've got a Booster II for my Minolta FLashmeter IV. Are you saying to simply point the booster at the scene and take a reading? Which attachment would you recommend? ANd I seem to remember there is a dial on the booster - where should that be set?

    Kirk

  2. #12
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Luna Pro SBC and F as well as the original which I believe is simply called the Luna Pro, are the meters I've used with great success.

    *

  3. #13
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes View Post
    Helen - I've got a Booster II for my Minolta Flashmeter IV. Are you saying to simply point the booster at the scene and take a reading? Which attachment would you recommend? And I seem to remember there is a dial on the booster - where should that be set?

    Kirk
    Kirk,

    Sorry to take so long to reply, but I wanted to put the gear together to demonstrate. Here's how it works with the L-508:



    The dial on the booster is set all the way round to H, then you compare the reading of a grey card or something similarly even with a spot reading taken without the booster. Adjust the meter's exposure compensation until the reading with the booster matches the reading without. My L-508 needs a compensation setting of -7 stops.

    As you can see, the meter is reading Ev -8.6 at ISO 100, or f/2 and a half at 1800 seconds. That reading was taken inside a dark room with barely enough light to see.

    For 'normal' use you adjust the booster's dial to get the readings the same, instead of adjusting the meter compensation.

    Best,
    Helen

  4. #14
    Greg Campbell's Avatar
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    Here's the ultimate (consumer) low-level meter.

    http://unihedron.com/projects/darksky/

    Is spits out magnitude per square arc second. The unit is a bit unwieldy, but still represents a surface brightness level. By installing an appropriate mask over the sensor, and calibrating the resultant values, you could make an exquisitely sensitive spot meter. I've been pining for one for some time, and hope to have one by this summer's monsoon / lightning season.

    -Greg

  5. #15
    Helen B's Avatar
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    If my quick and dirty maths is correct, that meter is sensitive to about Ev -9 at ISO 100, assuming that 22 magnitudes/square arcsecond is the lower limit of sensitivity. It might be more sensitive than that, but I couldn't find any other value on the website.

    Best,
    Helen

  6. #16
    Lee L's Avatar
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    It also reads as a reflectance meter covering about an 80 degree cone (1.532 steradians). A wise choice for its intended purpose, but not a replacement for your one degree spot meter.

    I'd think you'd need both a mask and optics, plus a properly aligned viewfinder to make it into a spotmeter. I'd also think that masking it down to that degree could possibly put it below the sensitivity of some other commercial meters like the LunaPros. But do report back here on your mods for the curious among us.

    Lee

  7. #17

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    Thanks Helen!

    I'm still hoping for that filter/spectra calc program/spreadsheet you mentioned a while back...

  8. #18
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    FWIW, I usually expose moonlit landscape scenes at ISO100, f/8 for 4 mins or thereabouts.
    I can't post any examples because the only ones I have on hand are made of pixels, but this exposure seems to work well for me.
    Lens caps and cable releases can become invisible at will. :D

  9. #19
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Take Care

    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft View Post
    The Olympus OM-2 and 4 will take exposures up to 2 minutes on auto and seem to do it fairly accurately if you bias to allow for reciprocity failure. Sadly they only go down to 1 sec on manual.

    David
    If you make long exposures on cameras with electronic shutters make sure you have a few spare batteries with you, because the cameras use them to power an electro- magnate to hold the shutter open, even for time exposures.
    Ben

  10. #20
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bentley Boyd View Post
    If you make long exposures on cameras with electronic shutters make sure you have a few spare batteries with you, because the cameras use them to power an electro- magnate to hold the shutter open, even for time exposures.
    Some well-designed cameras with electronic shutters have a mechanical B or T setting. Both my electronic shutter SLRs have this feature, as well as one mechanical shutter speed at flash synch, and the one with red LED indicators bleeds into the film compartment on really long exposures, so I remove the batteries for exposures of more than a few minutes with that body. This is not an uncommon problem among cameras with LEDs in the finder.

    Lee

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