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  1. #11
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    For colour film, the lower speed films that are oriented toward portraits and flesh tones are a great choice, because they tend to be a bit lower in contrast and more muted in colour than some others.

    Over the years, Vericolour II, Vericolour III, and Portra 160 NC have all worked well for me. I am looking forward to trying the new version of Portra 160 NC.

    This is, however, with fairly powerful flash units (Vivitar 283 initially, than Metz 202, and more recently Metz 60 CT1 or 60 CT2 flashes).

    If I had to use lower power flashes, I would probably use the Portra 400NC film.

    Matt

  2. #12

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    1. EOS 3

    2. Yes, I own a Canon ETTL-enabled flash

    I've shot mainly digital before during large-events, where I can automatically adjust the ISO up or down based on lighting conditions. But with film it's harder to do so since what I have in the SLR is basically the ISO I have to work with (minus or plus 1 stop with the lattitude of negative film). And add in the problems with tungsten lighting, it can be quite confusing.

    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    Unlike the others, I have no immediate recommendation to your question.

    First, let me ask you a few questions:

    1. What camera do you use?

    2. Do you already own a flash unit?

    3. If not, what is your budget?

    Quite frankly, if your shooting say a Nikon F5 with a SB-800 flash unit, the flash will auto-adjust to your film speed via the DX setting and the ambient light conditions as read through the lens!

    While use of flash can vary somewhat - generally it is all close in work - so if you think of my above example as the "total no worry" way to go - you adjust downward in terms of the capabilities of your flash unit and camera to attain the same (and maybe better, at times) result.

  3. #13

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    I'm not sure if you can do this on the EOS 3, but with my ELAN 7 I can change film mid roll.

    Any competent lab should be able to correct the color cast from tungsten lighting. (Read: Not a 1 hour lab, they have been bad in getting color temp correct from my experience.) If your really worried about color temperature, then shoot with the flash as your only light source. Shoot on manual mode, and set shutter to the x-sync speed, which is 1/200 on the eos 3.

  4. #14

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    I just got a roll of Fuji Superia X-tra 800 developed which was shot in mainly tungsten lighting indoors. I rated the roll at 800 iso and shot at 1/30 to 1/60th of a sec, at F2.8 to F5.6, and made sure I gave all the exposures +1/3 EV. In 75% of the shots I used bounced flash at -1/3 to +1/3 Flash Exposure Compensation, and the shots came out looking pretty decent whenever there's a 0 to +1/3 Flash Exposure Compensation added.

    Whenever there wasn't any flash used or when there's not a low enough ceiling to bounce the flash, the colors came out looking muddy, yellow-ish tint and grainy. So does this mean that I have to use my flash for any available light photos to help with the colors and less grain?

  5. #15

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    If you bounce the flash off of a ceiling that is too high, then there might not be enough flash power. In that case, the camera will just fire the flash at it's maximum output. Opening up your aperture will make the flash more effective.

    Color temperature is controlled during the printing stage. Where did you have the film developed? Take your film back there and ask them to reprint the film. If you don't want a lab to be modifying the color temperature of your photos, then shoot slides with the appropriate color filter in front of your camera.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by film_guy View Post
    Whenever there wasn't any flash used or when there's not a low enough ceiling to bounce the flash, the colors came out looking muddy, yellow-ish tint and grainy. So does this mean that I have to use my flash for any available light photos to help with the colors and less grain?
    This means you got gross underexposure. You certainly can make available light exposures without any use of flash, but to be successfull you have to tell your camera you won't use flash (turn it off). It might need exposures as long as several seconds though. Flash power falls off to the 4th power with disatnce just like radar, so if you want to use bounce with high ceilings you have to have very powerfull flash or even several powerful flashes.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanderx1 View Post
    This means you got gross underexposure. You certainly can make available light exposures without any use of flash, but to be successfull you have to tell your camera you won't use flash (turn it off). It might need exposures as long as several seconds though. Flash power falls off to the 4th power with disatnce just like radar, so if you want to use bounce with high ceilings you have to have very powerfull flash or even several powerful flashes.

    So does that mean I need to shoot higher ISO film like 1600 or 3200 since these situations cannot take iso 800 film? There's going to be situations when I cannot or don't prefer to use flash, and have to go by available light. And I thought film can take about one to one and half stop underexposure and still come out looking right, or am I wrong?

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by film_guy View Post
    So does that mean I need to shoot higher ISO film like 1600 or 3200 since these situations cannot take iso 800 film? There's going to be situations when I cannot or don't prefer to use flash, and have to go by available light. And I thought film can take about one to one and half stop underexposure and still come out looking right, or am I wrong?
    Its very hard to say without knowing what the exposure times were / would have been without flash, or what aperture setting you were using.

  9. #19

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    Exposure range from 1/25 sec F5.6 to 1/80 sec F2.8 without flash.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by film_guy View Post
    Exposure range from 1/25 sec F5.6 to 1/80 sec F2.8 without flash.
    If I where you then I'd go with the 1/80@f/2.8 instead of trying to use a faster film. Try to hold the camera steady.

    If your having a hard time holding the camera steady, then consider getting a monopod.

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