Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,550   Posts: 1,544,819   Online: 1047
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    101

    Always use contrast filters for B&W?

    Lately I've been shooting without any contrast filters. Anybody else do the same?

    I've been told that I should always have at least a Yellow #8 for outdoor B&W photography...

    I have filters...I'm just not a fan of dealing with the hassle (extra exposure calculation, etc) and that it didn't seem to make my prints any better.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,346
    With rare exceptions, I usually have a yellow (handheld), orange (bright handheld or tripod) or red (tripod) filter on my cameras.

    On a cloudy day or dark lighting conditions (caves, etc) I'll forgo the filters.

    I've been told I'll grow out of it, but I like contrastier prints as a general rule.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Louisiana, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,325
    Most of my 35mm shooting is without filters. It's the nature of the subject since most of my 35mm subjects are candids or off-the-cuff pictures. When I shoot medium format, it's mostly of more studied subjects and I almost always use some type of filter.

  4. #4
    reellis67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,887
    Images
    13
    I don't use them for most of what I do, but there are times when altering the tonal range of a subject calls for one. I always have a variety on hand when I go out, but I don't find that I use them very often. I think it depends a lot on your subject matter really, rather than some general 'rule'.

    - Randy

  5. #5
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Depends on the film.

    I've found that FP4+ looks OK without a filter, while APX100 really needs a yellow for outdoors shooting.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #6
    CPorter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    West KY
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,662
    Images
    24
    For me, it depends on my visualization of the final print and I always ask myself what a filter will do for the final product. They don't always come into play, at least for me anyway. I agree with Randy's comment that it greatly depends on the individual values within the subject matter. I try to view the scene looking to prevent those important values from merging and to then plan exposure (with or without a filter) and development accordingly.

    Chuck

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    236
    Filters are to be used for a reason. So shoot without them and with them and see what the difference is.
    It depends on a lot of factors. In my work I was suffering from white skies all the time so I was using a yellow orange filter and that helped. Later on I decided to try Tmax 400 and that film does not need a filter for proper tone in skies, so now I don't use one. I may use it if I want more contrast on close ups with texture or such where there is no skyes.
    Sometimes you want clouds to look bold, so a yellow, polarized, or combination of both filters might do the trick.
    The one thing to know is that it really is something personal and you will get to know when to use and when not to use a filter with lots of practice. I many times make more than one exposure with or without and decide later in the darkroom which one is the better one.

    Good luck!

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    258
    Doesn't using a filter slow down the speed of the film?

  9. #9
    marsbars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Spokane Wa.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    112
    I very rarely use contrast filters unless I really want some serious effect. About the only filters I use a lot is my ND filters. I have a fetish with moving water and they come in really handy.
    "There is something about the mystery
    of what is on a roll of film that keeps
    me shooting, none of that digital
    instant gratification for me."

  10. #10
    CPorter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    West KY
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,662
    Images
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by film_guy View Post
    Doesn't using a filter slow down the speed of the film?
    I would consider the speed of the film fixed; filters simply withhold light that enters the lens so a filter factor is applied to compensate for that reduction of light transmission by the filter. The factor itself is based on trying to maintain a middle gray negative density on a middle gray subject within the scene.

    Chuck

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin