Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,702   Posts: 1,548,453   Online: 900
      
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 55
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    Do you adjust the Ilford ASA rating to the weston then?

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Southern Cal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    485
    Images
    14
    No, I just move the dial on the meter "about a notch". If you want, I can find the URL for a site that has a lot of info about Weston meters when I get home from work.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    I'm just curious. 400 weston is what 500ASA?

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Southern Cal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    485
    Images
    14
    http://perso.club-internet.fr/ptthome/weston-man.htm

    http://www.diaxa.com/weston/westontwo.htm

    http://www.westonmaster.com/

    For mine (unless I got it backwards) if using ASA100 film, I set the meter for Weston 80. For ASA 500 I would set the meter for Weston 400.

    Here are some quotes from a Weston meter page.
    In short: Models- Master V, Master IV, Universal III and all cine models
    Sangamo/Weston Source - Use the film speed rating recommended by the Film manufacturer. OR -Cine Models only - the next lower rating is recommended.
    Ensure that the ASA or Din rating is set in the appropriate window of your Master V
    *****Regarding the Models Weston Master II universal and earlier...
    Use the next lower rating to the B.S or ASA arithmetical index recommended by the manufacturer. *****

  5. #15
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Nah. I don't worry at all. I picked up a Pentax Spotmeter (no modification) on Ebay for next to nothing. I meter shadows, midtones, highlights. Then I guess at an exposure which will give good shadows. If the highlights are way high I might make a note of it for the development.

    But if the meter is off, doesn't worry me at all. As long as it's consistent.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #16
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (BobF @ Dec 13 2002, 10:14 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Because of a recent thread about meters I have been obsessing about my meter&#39;s accuracy and metering technique.&nbsp; With all the inherent inaccuracies of metering and metering technique I am wondering about how many of you worry about half stop differences in different meters ...</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    In a previous life I was involved in calibrating "Light Meters" - in particular, those employing Cascade Photomultiplier systems. The set-up was on an optical bench, with Intralaboratory "standard lamps" calibrated by the National Bureau of Standards, and amperage-contolled power supplies. (Note 1)

    At the time, there was an idea that the Honeywell 1/21 Spotmeter could be used in some of the light measurements we were doing. Three were purchased and "wrung out" on the bench. The results were surprising, so we contacted Honeywell, and after a rather tough struggle, got them to tell us what their criteria for accuracy was ... plus or minus (+/-) one-half "stop".

    I use the Gossen "Ultra Pro" - usually with the incident attachment - for studio work . Gossen states that the operating tolerance for the UP is plus or minus (+/-) one-third "stop".

    There are so many variables involved in photography - tolerances on film speed (really difficult to pry that information from the manufacturer) - remember the information sheets on Polaroid film that directed the use of increased - or decreased film speed settings -; Tolerances on shutter speeds; aperture stops --- does anyone remember the Bell and Howell 35mm camera where the lens aperture was labelled in "T" stops, instead of "f/" - to indicate a more realistic system of controlling the amount of light (T)ransmitted through the lens?

    Add to all this the human element -- the subjective judgement involved in metering the "scene" - and the finely exposed film that is routinely turned out is a tribute to the skills that "involved" photographers have mastered.

    In sum, I avoid making the statement, "I always expose within "x" fraction of a stop." I can&#39;t tell - all I really have to determine that is the equivalent of a rubber ruler.

    Note 1: The primary voltage in the first stage of one of these Cascade Photomultipliers is usually fairly high -- about 1800 volts. I took a "belt" from one of those once - not really dangerous - but a real eye-opener.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    South Pasadena, CA USA
    Posts
    470
    It seems like half stops would mean almost nothing to BW users, but would be pretty critical to people who use transparency film, ESPECIALLY people who photograph people on transparency film.

    And for that, it seems like you could do a simple test once to make sure the meter meters uniformly relative to itself, and then you&#39;re done. It doesn&#39;t really matter if it matches other meters or not, unless you have to use more than one meter in differing situations.

    As for BW, I can&#39;t imagine a situation in which a half stop would mean the loss of anything. As a practical matter, it seems it would only mean that you expose your paper a second or two longer or shorter, or MAYBE burn or dodge for a second or two in some highlight or shadow.

    Am I missing something?

    dgh
    David G Hall

  8. #18
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,855
    It seems to me it's an unwritten truth about exposure meters, that no two ever give the same reading, either in reflected or incidental methods, but somehow give correct exosure, I wonder why that is.

  9. #19
    jovo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,086
    Images
    191
    When I dropped my Adorama (Soligor) one degree digial spot meter a year ago, I bought a replacement of the same thing (only an earlier model) on ebay never expecting I could bring the broken one back to life. Since then I've had it repaired and calibrated by Richard Ritter (in Vermont) to whatever absolute standard it is that he uses. Now, the two meters disagree by about two or three tenths of an EI and I'm sorely tempted to send in the second meter to be 'standardized' with the first. Thing is, with a very small compensation, the two work splendidly and my exposures are just fine. So....the anal urge for perhaps unnecessary precision is in a precarious balance with common sense practicality. I think, for the time being at least, I'll spend the cost of calibration on film. Or maybe not....;-)


    BTW...I encountered Richard Ritter at the View Camera LF conference in Springfield last month. The guy looks like a Vermont 'character' poster boy, but man does he know his stuff. If you need view camera or spot meter (Pentax or Soligor under its' own brand or rebranded like Adorama) work done, this dude's got it goin on!! Highly recommended!!
    John Voss

    My Blog

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    I am of the upiinion that there is nothing made that is absolutely accurate. There are only differences that matter and do not matter.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin