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  1. #41

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    Ok, getting back to "coolest tricks" I have one for LF users. Turn the shutter around so that you dont have to stand on your tippy toes to look at the aperture. I turned mine sidewise facing the right and can look almost from behind the camera at the apperture and shooting speed. I bet this is one of those "why didn't I think of that?"....

  2. #42

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Jorge @ Feb 25 2003, 05:06 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I bet this is one of those "why didn&#39;t I think of that?"....</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    I bet you have not used any Prontor shutters yet ;-)

    BTW: you might have to turn a Prontor shutter, too. Depending on your camera model, the second cable release might interfere with the tilt mechanism.

  3. #43

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    Jorge and Thilo,

    I must be more dense than normal today.

    What do you mean turn it around, or turn it sideways? Do you mean rotate it?

    I mount my shutters so f22 is straight up. That way if I am in low light I always know where to set the aperture without really having to look.

    dgh
    David G Hall

  4. #44

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (tschmid @ Feb 25 2003, 10:58 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Jorge @ Feb 25 2003, 05:06 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I bet this is one of those &quot;why didn&#39;t I think of that?&quot;....</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    I bet you have not used any Prontor shutters yet ;-)

    BTW: you might have to turn a Prontor shutter, too. Depending on your camera model, the second cable release might interfere with the tilt mechanism. </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    If you mean the modern prontor shutters, then they are designed for studio work where you have all those gizmos sticking out of it to set shutter speed and aperture. If you have all that then you dont need to turn it sidewise, but is hard to carry on the field all them little slides. If you mean the old prontor shutters with the little wheel on top, yep....I have not used any, nor do I plan on doing it, at &#036;5 a sheet I am getting the best shutter I can afford.

    David, right if f/22 is facing up I am betting you have to stand on your toes or bend down to check the aperture, just turn it so the f/22 is facing to the right or left, whatever you prefer.

  5. #45

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    Jorge,

    Thanks&#33; I will try that. Any other "why didn&#39;t I think of that"s up your sleeve?

    dgh
    David G Hall

  6. #46

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Jorge @ Feb 25 2003, 07:05 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>If you mean the modern prontor shutters, then they are designed for studio work where you have all those gizmos sticking out of it to set shutter speed and aperture.</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    You do not need to apply the aperture and speed setting "gizmos" on a Prontor professional shutter. Without these bells and whistles, it has aprox. the same size as any #1 shutter. The only disadvantage is that there is no real and smaller #0 shutter. The #0 is a #1 with another barrel thread.

    In his usual mounting position (the factory default with the shutter name on bottom in upright letters), the PP always had the time scale on the left and the aperture scale on the right side. Both settings are mirrored on the top. The aperture control by the second cable release is also convenient in the field. Moreover, for reproducible two-second exposures, you can simply press the self-cocking shutter twice.

    BTW: the PP shutter is out of production since the end of 2001 and was available 30 Years. He is now a “historic” one, too

  7. #47
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    My coolest trick?

    I have my films in the freezer&#33;

    I don&#39;t think that there will be a cooler one&#33;&#33;&#33; ;-)))
    Good light and nice shadows!

    www.artfoto.ch

  8. #48
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Here&#39;s another one for exposures that are too long for the shutter but too short for a stopwatch (i.e., 2-30 sec). Use a metronome set on 120 or 240, and once you&#39;ve got the beat in your head, press the shutter, count the requisite number of beats and release. Consider how accurate a musician needs to be, and you&#39;ll realize that this is a very accurate method. You can find a cheap electronic metronome the size of a credit card from any instrument shop.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #49

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    Best method to avoid watermarks while drying film? Without risk of any scratches?
    Put the whole tank reel/holder in a salad dryer.

  10. #50

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    Thilo,

    I like that one. Do you always dry rollfilm that way? How long does it take? How do you dry sheet film?

    dgh

    David G Hall



 

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