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  1. #51

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    David,

    you cannot *dry* film in a salad dryer. But you can remove all excess water with a single pull on the string (of course not too strong). The film is free of water drops (which will cause watermarks) afterwards and can be dried as usual. I use a Durst UT100 dryer.

    I process most of my films in a JOBO-Processor. Depending on the amount of sheet film, I use either the sheet film reels or the Expert Drum. The salad dryer method does only work, if the film is in some kind of holder. I have once tried the Combiplan Tank holder and it worked, too. I use Drysonal (clean Ethanol) for single sheets B&W developed in Expert Drums and remove excess stabilizer on color sheet film between my fingers. 5x7 (13x18cm) is my largest sheet size.

  2. #52

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    Thilo,

    Oh, I get it. You spin the film. I thought you meant you put the reels in the thing because it's got holes in it and will let the film dry without having to really touch anything.

    I am going to have to try the spinning trick!

    dgh
    David G Hall

  3. #53
    lee
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    I have always used photo-flo and while the film is still on the reel either 35 or 120, after the photo-flo before removing the film, I remove them from the tank (can) and grip tightly and shake the s**t out of the reel for a couple of times. OK, maybe 4 or 5 times. Then I just hang up the film and use the empty film can if 35 for a weight to allow it to dry straight. 120 reguires that I use a clothes pin or an extra 35 metal film container. I don't touch any film after I hang it up. You are just asking for trouble.


    le\c

  4. #54

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    I have some Prontor Press shutters (from the 60s/70s) that came with my Rodenstock Ysaron lenses. Instead of worrying about the second release cable, I just don't hook it up. After all, the release cables have locking screws anyway. I found that having two cables just confused me... which one is for taking the picture and which one is for preview (and ruining a sheet of film)? It's safer and easier to just use the one that will take the picture, since I like to have a peek at the depth of field anyway. I don't have the little slidey remotey thingies. They just seem like they would be in the way.

  5. #55

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (SteveGangi @ Feb 26 2003, 02:54 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I found that having two cables just confused me... which one is for taking the picture and which one is for preview (and ruining a sheet of film)?</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    Well, that is a simple one: use different ones. I have a shorter blue cable realease with a smaller push button for the aperture control and a larger black one with a large push button (a Horesman) for the release. Easy to distinguish even in the dark.

  6. #56

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    No&#33; That&#39;s too easy&#33; Why do I always miss the obvious solutions???

  7. #57

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (SteveGangi @ Feb 27 2003, 12:33 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>No&#33;&nbsp; That&#39;s too easy&#33; </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    Ok, there is another, more expensive solution. Buy the original Prontor double cable release. It has a grip, a push button and a seperate dial switch for the aperture control. Unfortunately, they are out of production and stock, but used ones currently start at US&#036;100. Yes, one hundered and more...

  8. #58
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Hey, that&#39;s cheap by comparison to the Prontor timer for long exposures, not to mention two of them for the double release shutter.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #59

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    This is not what I would call a trick, but I&#39;ve put together a tool for dead-on metering for infrared films. I start with a Minolta Auto Meter VF and modify it so that it responds the way the film would. Used correctly, it is even more reliable than a regular light meter. Check it out at http://www.davidromano.com


  10. #60
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    Only real "trick" I can think of is figuring the approximate actual aperture with my calculator. Fer&#39;instance 100mm len at f/8. Divide the focal length by aperture to get the aperture factor or 12.5 (which should be the real size of the aperture in mm). Measure the total extension, say its 150 mm from focal plane to lensboard. Divide that by the aperture factor to get 12. That tells me I&#39;m really working with an aperture of f/12 for that magnification.
    The math can be swapped around to figure what to set at a particular extension to get the working aperuter desired. Say the 150 mm total extension and the 100 mm lens, you want f/8. Divide 150 by 8 to get the factor of 18.75. Divide 100 by the factor 18.75 and you get 5.33. So you would set the aperture to a smidge wider than f/5.6 to get a working aperture of f/8.
    It&#39;s worked every time I&#39;ve used it. Only hard part is finding the damn calculator when I want it, it tends to turn invisible on me at times.
    Gary Beasley



 

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