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  1. #31
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David H. Bebbington View Post
    There is probably a worthwhile technical point here - if you are shooting with a reasonable 210 lens on 4x5" and applying enough (forward) front tilt to get front to back sharpness, there is actually no need to close down further than f11 or so - in fact, you would probably get a respectable result at full aperture (assuming this is f5.6) or f8. This would arguablly represent an acceptable trade-off against the risk of wind blur with longer exposures!

    Regards,

    David
    I'm shooting an 8x10, normal lens is 300mm, with occasional 19" and 210mm. I can rarely use much tilt...the "foreground" is often a tree close to the camera that goes from the bottom of the image to the top...or close branches that extend into the upper corners of the image Front tilt just throws the top of the image way out of focus.

    I know what you are getting on about, but that sort of image is out in the open...rarely deep in the redwoods. Using a lens wide open or at f11 would be wasting film (if one wants good focus throughout the whole image).

    Vaughn

    Vaughn

  2. #32
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wager123 View Post
    is there a methoid to blur water and still keep the other objects in the picture sharp even if there is a slight wind?
    stupid i know , but there might be a way.
    mitch

    30 years ago I started to play with multiple exposures for no other reason than the Minolta Autocord I had just purchased could do it. For the next 10 years I discovered many things about the use of multiple exposures; one discovery was that in an image of marlin grass and clouds made using multiple exposures on a windy day some areas of grass were rendered absolutely pin sharp after giving 14 exposures over a period of 10 minutes. The clouds and other areas of grass where blurred as I expected and had planned for. I found it hard to believe but regularly repeated this in the next few years.

    I also noticed that the wind seems to take a particular course through a field of standing grass that can be identified by the areas of grass that are blurred next to grass that is sharp.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  3. #33
    Baxter Bradford's Avatar
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    Rule of thumb 1/4 to 2s - there will be exceptions!

    Variables: speed of flowing water, Focal length of lens, distance to water from camera.

    The multi-exposure that Les uses can be very effective in near constant water conditions, freezing specular drops, it is not really any good with coastal waves.

  4. #34
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baxter Bradford View Post
    The multi-exposure that Les uses can be very effective in near constant water conditions, freezing specular drops, it is not really any good with coastal waves.
    OK, now I have to try it with coastal waves, just to see what it looks like. It obviously won't look "normal", but it could look interesting.

    Lee

  5. #35
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baxter Bradford View Post

    The multi-exposure that Les uses can be very effective in near constant water conditions, freezing specular drops, it is not really any good with coastal waves.
    Sorry Baxter I have to disagree with you or at least modify your comment re coastal waves. Multiples do work with moderately sizes waves. For those who have my book see page 60 "Tide Artog, Wales" to see the result of multiples with waves.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  6. #36
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baxter Bradford View Post
    snip...The multi-exposure that Les uses can be very effective in near constant water conditions, freezing specular drops, it is not really any good with coastal waves.
    Definitely different than waterfalls and creeks, but "not really any good" is subjective. I have used it for an interesting effect, but that was years ago. When one clicks the shutter is what can make multiple exposures with medium to big waves interesting . Making the exposures whenever the waves hit rocks, yields an interesting fog around those rocks...especially multiple semi-long exposures (instead of freezing shots). I have a photo of a single rock in the surf zone (multiple long exposures of the waves hitting the rock) -- it made the rock look more like a mountain top sticking out of the clouds.

    Multiple short exposures of the surf zone can make the ocean look like there is a thin layer of fog just above the water.

    Vaughn

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    I have a photo of a single rock in the surf zone (multiple long exposures of the waves hitting the rock) -- it made the rock look more like a mountain top sticking out of the clouds.

    Multiple short exposures of the surf zone can make the ocean look like there is a thin layer of fog just above the water.

    Vaughn
    Cool info Vaughn, got to try this.

    Best regards

    john

  8. #38

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    The information is very interesting. I like all post.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    Some of the shots I always enjoy seeing here are those of "babbling brooks" where the water flowing over the rocks has a soft "silken" appearance. Even though everything else may be in sharp focus - the water flows over the rocks in a soft silk-like fashion.

    How is this done? Is it by exposure settings? Or is it done in during processing?
    It's done in fauxtoshop. Can't be done with film.

  10. #40
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Ghost thread alert! The original discussion was in 2007, and the original poster (along with several other key contributors) no longer participate in APUG!

    And NO, it's not done in Photoshop. It's called a long exposure. Anything much past 1 second will give you blurred water to a greater or lesser degree, and even exposures between 1/8th and 1 second will blur water a bit.

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