Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,973   Posts: 1,558,723   Online: 774
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 40
  1. #1
    copake_ham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NYC or Copake or Tucson
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4,092
    Images
    56

    How do you get the "silken" look on flowing water?

    Some of the shots I always enjoy seeing here are those of "babbling brooks" where the water flowing over the rocks has a soft "silken" appearance. Even though everything else may be in sharp focus - the water flows over the rocks in a soft silk-like fashion.

    How is this done? Is it by exposure settings? Or is it done in during processing?

  2. #2
    noblebeast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    555
    Images
    42
    Loooooonnnng exposures. Well, they don't have to be real long, but a few seconds at least. I know others here have a lot more experience with this than I do, but I have found that neutral density filters are often employed in the technique. Not to mention a good, steady tripod!

    Joe
    Latent Images Plastic Toy Cameras

    "Don't ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and go do that, because what the world needs is people who have come alive" - Howard Thurman

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Victoria BC
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,183
    Images
    107
    Yeah, it's just a long exposure thing. You can use neutral density filters to slow the light rushing through your lens if you're shooting in daylight and want longer exposure times than you'd get stopping down all the way.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
    .

  4. #4
    KenM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    800
    This photograph:

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...500&ppuser=520

    was, I believe, about a 45 second exposure. The length of exposure was driven by a few things: the aperture size (small, to get good DOF), and the low light level.

    There are quite a few things that need to be taken into account, as mentioned above. Wind, DOF, speed of the water, etc. all need to be taken into account. Your best bet is to experiment: find a stream (or something similar), and make images using different exposure times. Try and remember how fast the faster was moving; once you have the negs in hand, you'll be able to draw your own conclusions about what shutter speed will give you the 'look' your after

    Good luck!
    Cheers!

    -klm.

  5. #5
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Henrico, Virginia USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,604
    Images
    32
    Expanding on what Ken said, if the water flow is too heavy and your exposure is too long, you get a really nice picture of a white blob. Of course, none of my pictures have ever looked like that....
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,243
    Images
    9
    The secret is a small aperture and a tripod. Next time you are in Tucson go out to Tanque Verde Canyon in the morning and practice on the water.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Walnut Creek, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    558
    Images
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    Some of the shots I always enjoy seeing here are those of "babbling brooks" where the water flowing over the rocks has a soft "silken" appearance. Even though everything else may be in sharp focus - the water flows over the rocks in a soft silk-like fashion.

    How is this done? Is it by exposure settings? Or is it done in during processing?
    Long exposure is the way to go, but you also might try long multiple exposures - gives a bit more of a punch to that silky flow.

    I believe our Les Maclean has posted some examples of this technique in the past.

    Mike

  8. #8
    dmr
    dmr is offline
    dmr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    493
    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    the water flows over the rocks in a soft silk-like fashion.

    How is this done? Is it by exposure settings? Or is it done in during processing?
    That's the "bridal veil" look, no photoshop required. You will need a tripod. You do want a bit of sunlight as a highlight on the flow you wish to feature. Slow exposure, just enough to subordinate the detail of the flow. Moderate DOF, keep some of the still stuff in clear focus. Try exposures from maybe 1/8 or so to a couple seconds.

  9. #9
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,244
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
    Long exposure is the way to go, but you also might try long multiple exposures - gives a bit more of a punch to that silky flow.

    I believe our Les Maclean has posted some examples of this technique in the past.

    Mike
    In Les' book, he breaks an indicated 4 second exposure into 32 exposures at 1/125, so it's more what I'd consider multiple short exposures in that particular instance. Of course you can go with any combination of multiple exposures of any length that sum to the proper exposure length, and get a variety of effects in doing so.

    The best way to get what you want, as always, is to make some tests and see what gets you where you want to go.

    The longer the exposure, the "silkier", up to the point of overexposing.

    Lee

  10. #10
    johnnywalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,256
    Images
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
    Long exposure is the way to go, but you also might try long multiple exposures - gives a bit more of a punch to that silky flow.

    I believe our Les Maclean has posted some examples of this technique in the past.

    Mike
    I've seen a couple of examples of water done this way, I think by Les and/or Barry Thornton. They do give a sense of motion, and not so "silky". I prefer them myself.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin