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  1. #11
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Thats pretty similar to the analogy I like to use, a faucet and a bucket. Rate of flow versus time turned on to fill the bucket. Very easy to understand and a very visual approach.
    Gary Beasley

  2. #12
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    I'm glad I'm not the only one that keeps using water to explain this! :-) I have the analogy slightly different:

    "Imagine a bath full of water. Beneath the plughole is a bucket. Your job is to exactly fill the bucket with water.

    You can control three things; the size of the plughole (aperture), the size of the bucket (film speed) and the amount of time that the plug is out of the hole (shutter speed)."

    I generally elaborate with Delta 3200 being a thimble, Velvia being a whacking great barrel and so on. Once they've grasped the "double the size of the plughole and then either a) double the size of the bucket or b) half the time the plug is out of the hole" and all the permutations you can explain about film grain, colour saturation, d-o-f and blurring in small easy stages.

    The problem with analogies is that it's easy to sound damn patronising when using them, so I usually start off with a warning that this is a noddy-level explanation and a pre-emptive apology!

    Regards,

    Frank
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  3. #13

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    I teach a basic beginners nature photography class at night. "Taking Better Pictures" is always the goal. I do teach f/stop, shutter speed etc.., but what works best is giving them examples of composition.

    My first class I always teach them to:
    1. Move in closer, 2. Watch Headroom 3. Rule of Thirds. I don't need to tell you about these three but you need to try and communicate it by examples.

    I want my students to feel better about just taking better pictures. As their composition improves so does their willingness/eagerness to take it to the next level. The tech stuff and their understanding of it comes later.

  4. #14
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  5. #15

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    Teaching exposure - deepest symphaties. It's bloody difficult to teach at the best of times.

  6. #16

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    A terrific tool in teaching exposure is a 4x5 camera, a Polaroid back, a bunch of Type 55 P/N film, and a light box. Students get an instant and engaging demonstration of what might otherwise be vaguely understood words. A favorite exercise of mine when I was teaching was to ask the students how the appearance of negatives made of the following subjects would differ: full frame shots, metered throught the lens, of black, white, and gray poster board. Knowing what a meter is up to goes hand-in-hand with understanding exposure.
    I just found this website, so excuse this long-belated reply. njb

  7. #17
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