Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,563   Posts: 1,573,345   Online: 1043
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,332
    Images
    8
    I have been known to bracket when I was just unsure of the exposure.

    MY problem (YMMV) is remembering to meter carefully - especially with chrome. I tend to let the TTL meters in the SLRs do their job. This is fine, until there's a big expanse of sky that overwhelms the foreground, which gets underexposed (but the clouds are pretty :rolleyes: ).

    If I would just meter lower, lock exposure, ...

    Bottom line, whatever works. But experience will teach you!

    Cheers.

    David

  2. #22
    rbarker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,222
    Images
    2
    Although bracketing doesn't work well with active subjects, as Nicole mentioned, I tend to look at the practice as being insurance. Not just insurance that I have the exposure nailed, but insurance against other factors that might damage the film. Other than with local subjects that can be conveniently re-shot, film is probably the least expensive element in making the image.

    So, with LF B&W, I'll often make a backup shot at the same exposure, and then bracket plus and minus by a stop. For color, the bracketing is 1/3 stop. The trick is to keep the film organized so the backup sheets are not processed at the same time as the primary film.

    Similarly, when shooting color on important projects, I'll separate the film into smaller batches, and have it processed on different days. That way, if the lab has a problem, the whole project isn't lost.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  3. #23
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    I think that bracketing is especially important when shooting tranparency films. Holding those highlights from going blank is so important and sometimes a scene just looks better a half a stop darker than even the most carefully metered exposure.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,410
    Images
    4
    My 35mm camera could be set to automatically bracket 3 consecutive exposures by a user config'd amount. This combined with the fast motor drive meant I could make a significant contribution to the continuing viability of profitable film manufacture. I've never bothered to learn how to use the feature.

    OTOH with the LF my preference is to follow Ole's approach. If the negative could be significant, I like to expose 2-3 sheets the same and develop them differently.

  5. #25
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Brooklyn, N.Y. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,458
    Images
    47
    It seems to me bracketing exposures is only useful if you process your own sheet film

    I have shot 35mm color roll film bracketed and taken it to local lab for 'normal' processing and the stock prints returned all look the same. There is no evidence of my bracketing in 36 images. This means to me that perhaps the 'lab' compensates for over/under exposure in their processing of normal.?

    So I feel bracketing is only effective in the development stage of sheet film where processing compensation can be applied one neg at a time.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,410
    Images
    4
    Hi Bruce, bracketing is conducive with processing your own film and printing. I know that labs often use automatic print density settings for the roll of film.

    Not so sure if this is also performed for each individual frame printed. However if it were, this could certainly reduce the differences apparant with bracketing (the tone separation and colour shifts may be less apparant without changes in density also).
    It might be worth asking the lab to print 'straight' without any exposure compensation adjustments between individual frames, to see if that makes any difference. They should be able to do this imo.

    Best, John.

  7. #27
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Posts
    921
    Images
    14
    I shoot mostly BW LF. I don't bracket for this except rarely. Bracketing is a huge waste of time. Chances are the picture is a dud anyway, right? Really. In ten pictures, how many are keepers? Next, there is all that processing, loading holders, cleaning holders, proofing, indexing, and the rest. Then, if I do bracket a frame and then at the end of the day, I'm short a piece of film, I'm really pissed.

    Don't bracket, get it right the first time and save that sheet of film for your 'moonrise'.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,410
    Images
    4
    Betcha Ansel wished he'd bracketed Moonrise, with the effort it required to print over the years following.

  9. #29
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Posts
    921
    Images
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    Betcha Ansel wished he'd bracketed Moonrise, with the effort it required to print over the years following.
    Bracketing would not have cut it. He was so far off. He exposed for the moon (the highlights) in a very contrasty situation and developed for a what? What was the dude thinking? Was the zone system out to lunch on the guy? The way he writes it after the fact, that it was a source of genius that he remembered how bright the moon was, footcandles this and that. Holy cow.

    Nice pic though.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  10. #30
    smieglitz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,864
    Images
    97
    When I shot 35mm I eventually got around to bracketing by taking three frames at the exposure I thought would be correct, then one over and one under by a full stop. That way, no matter how I cut the film, one frame that was the exposure I planned on being correct would never end up being the last frame on a negative strip and I could always get it flatter in the enlarger negative carrier as a result. It would also leave me two other backups in case the first was somehow damaged and I'd have the other two in case my exposure calculation was off.

    Since I stopped shooting 35mm I've also stopped bracketing although I will still expose a backup sheet.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin