Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,945   Posts: 1,585,826   Online: 1000
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 36
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    862
    Images
    42
    Selenium cells take a time to die, and the linearity of response seems to go first. I was having periodic underexposure problems and eventually traced it back to my Weston V in the mid to low EV range. Spot checks in good light failed to show up the discrepancy.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Behind the Orange Curtain
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    28
    I have meters from the 1930s (literally) that are still active and lively. I've got selenium meters that are dead. A lot of it depends on how well they were kept. Humidity kills cells. Dirt and grit foul meter movements. Dropping them doesn't do them any good at all.

    It's a good idea to check any meter against a known-good one for accuracy across the range you expect to use it. Any meter, expensive, cheap, old, new, can be off.

  3. #13
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Latte Land, Washington
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    832
    Good morning;

    I am still using a Weston Master II from around the late 1950's. It still seems to be working when checked on the Kyoritsu and the good old "1/film speed = seconds at f 16" guide line in daylight. I even bought a Weston Master V to be sent out for repair to go along with it. I like them. They do not require batteries, even if they go not go down very far in low light. If I really want take a photograph in moonlight, I will drag out the Gossen Luna-Six or something equivalent.

    If you keep the Weston meter in a dry environment, it should last a very long time and give you very good service, except for the extreme low light level thing. Low light level; OK. Extreme low light level; no.

    I still believe in older technology. Just because something has an excessive accumulation of years does not mean that it is obsolete. (I hope that statement applies to me also.)

    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    282
    I've had very good luck with selenium meters, although I do have a Olympus Auto Eye where the cell has definately degraded over time. Nicholas' explanation of the combination of light and moisture degrading the cells is the best and most logical I've seen. It also explains why meters (kept in the dark most of the time) hold up better than cameras (exposed to light and moisture much more). I have had more problems with CdS meters than selenium.

  5. #15
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    I must report that my trusty Soviet-built Leningrad IV selenium cell meter has worked fine since I purchased it in Czechoslovakia, for 14 bucks equivalent, in 1978. All remarks about selenium cell meters at very low light obtain for this one, as well. BTW, despite its provenance, I have detected no excessive red sensitivity. Nyuck, Nyuck.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  6. #16
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,439
    Images
    148
    You can be lucky and they keep working, or like in my case the Weston Master V cell gave up. Many Weston's sold second hand have cells that are on there way out.

    I use a Leica meter, which I want to replace, the Leica dealer I use won't sell the ones with selenium cells at all because hesays they are nowhere near accurate. Mine is but it's damaged and temperamental.

    You run the risk of not noticing your meters failing so it's important to check it every few months, (about twice a year).

    Ian

  7. #17
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,396
    My experience mirrors what others have posted. About 1/2 of my selenium meters are shot. The other 1/2 work fine.

  8. #18
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,108
    In case of need, this company offers custom cut, contacted selenium cells:

    http://www.megatron.co.uk/homepage.html

    (I posted this here a year ago; perhaps someone has given this a try by now.)

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Behind the Orange Curtain
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    28
    Interesting. I've seen the Megatron site but for some reason I never really looked at it.

    "Our experienced exposure meter specialists also recommend a wide range of repairs and servicing to all Weston Master & Euromaster exposure meters: Calibration check - £22; Recalibration, servicing and minor adjustments - £36; New photocell fitted, recalibration & servicing - £42; New movement fitted, recalibration & servicing - £55; New photocell & new movement fitted, recalibration & servicing - £66. All prices include UK carriage and VAT."

    That's a lot of money, especially at current exchange rates. But if you love that Weston Master, that might be worthwhile.

  10. #20
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,108
    That special service is new to me. I rather thought of ordering just a cell of the size needed to substitute for a died cell. Especially for in-camera meters.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin